Bobby Wesner Produces, Performs

October 6, 2017

Bobby Wesner, visiting instructor of dance, along with Holly Handman-Lopez, visiting assistant professor of dance, produced Oberlin Dance Intensive, a week of intensive dancing and sharing for high school students. Wesner and Handman-Lopez also performed their duet Eleven Years in at the Akron Fringe Festival. Wesner’s professional company, Neos Dance Theater, was installed on the third floor of the New Union Center for the Arts in September 2017. 

Holly Handman-Lopez Produces, Performs

October 6, 2017

Holly Handman-Lopez, visiting assistant professor of dance, along with Bobby Wesner, visiting instructor of dance, produced Oberlin Dance Intensive, a week of intensive dancing and sharing for high school students. Handman-Lopez and Wesner also performed their duet Eleven Years in at the Akron Fringe Festival.

Sebastiaan Faber Interviewed Widely About Catalonia

October 6, 2017

Sebastiaan Faber, professor of Hispanic studies, was widely interviewed and quoted about the escalating situation in the Catalonian region of Spain. He co-authored an article in the Nation and was quoted in both the Washington Post and Bill Moyers' Daily Reads. Faber appeared on Democracy Now!, both in television and web features, Real News Network, Free Speech TV's Rising Up with Sonali , and on KPFT's Hi Monitor. He was also interviewed in Slate.

Janet Fiskio and Chie Sakakibara Awarded Grant

September 30, 2017

Janet Fiskio and Chie Sakakibara were awarded a $40,000 National Science Foundation conference award for “Oral History and Local Knowledge: Methods of Resilience” in the Arctic Social Sciences Program. The grant supported a community history workshop in Africatown, Alabama at the historic Union Missionary Baptist Church. Approximately 40 community members, Inupiat elders, and Oberlin faculty and students participated in the workshop held during fall 2017.

Mattson Essay on Artificial Intelligence and "Gayface" Widely Quoted

September 20, 2017

Associate Professor of Sociology Greggor Mattson's critique of a study about face recognition technology and sexual orientation was widely quoted. The study, conducted by two researchers at Stanford Graduate School of Business, claimed that artificial intelligence could detect gay and lesbian faces more accurately than humans and was evidence of a prenatal hormonal cause of homosexuality. Mattson critiqued the methods used to train the algorithms, the outdated concepts that motivated them, and "the stunning tone-deafness" of the authors' defense of their ethics. The piece was quoted by such English-language outlets as Inside Higher Ed, Vice's Motherboard, and Outline, and it was quoted in German by Wired and Süddeutsche Zeitung. Read Mattson's critique "Artificial Intelligence Discovers Gayface. Sigh."

Chie Sakakibara Awarded Best Paper

September 18, 2017

Chie Sakakibara, assistant professor of environmental studies, received an award for “Best Paper” with her piece "No Whale, No Music: Climate Change and Cultural Resilience Among the Iñupiat of Arctic Alaska." The paper took top honors in Category 1: Oral Traditions and Expressions and was presented on September 6-8, 2017 at Sharing Cultures 20175th International Conference on Intangible Heritage in Barcelos, Portugal.

Drew Wilburn Gives Invited Lectures in London

September 18, 2017

Drew Wilburn, associate professor of classics, archaeology, and humanities, gave two invited lectures in London during May 2017. At the British Museum, he presented his research on the archaeological findspots of magical papyri in Egypt, entitled "Investigating the Magical Papyri as Artifacts." This work is part of a larger project related to archaeological context and spell manuals that were used by specialists during the late Roman and early Christian periods (3rd-6th centuries CE). He also gave a public lecture at Treadwell's Bookshop, entitled "Archaeology of Spells: A Case Study from Karanis, Egypt." This lecture presented Drew's research on a magical love spell and a cache of more than 80 inscribed bones found during the University of Michigan's excavations at the Roman period site of Karanis.

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