Photo of Chris Trinity
  • Assistant Professor of Classics
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Education

  • PhD, Brown University, 2007
  • MA, University of Arizona, 2000
  • BA, Pitzer College, 1996)

Biography

My primary research interests revolve around the works of Seneca, an important philosopher, tragedian, and politician of the 1st C. CE.  Here at Oberlin I teach a variety of language courses (Latin and Greek), Roman history, as well as special topics courses in Latin literature.

 

Notes

  • Christopher Trinacty Lectures, Publishes

    October 30, 2018

    Christopher Trinacty, associate professor of classics, gave an invited lecture titled “The End of the World: Catastrophic Flooding in Seneca’s Natural Questions” at George Washington University. The lecture suggests a new way of reading the flood narrative of the work as part of larger Stoic ideas about time and cyclical history. Trinacty also published a chapter in the volume Intratextuality and Latin Literature (DeGruyter, 2018). The chapter, “Nulla res est quae non eius quo nascitur notas reddat (Nat. 3.21.2): Intertext to Intratext in Senecan Prose and Poetry” analyzes the way that Seneca links his works to those of his predecessors. Trinacty also published a book review on P. Kragelund’s Roman Historical Drama: The Octavia in Antiquity and Beyond in the journal Gnomon 90 (2018) 660-62.

  • Chris Trinacty Guest Edits and Contributes Essay

    March 8, 2018

    Chris Trinacty, associate professor of classics, recently acted as guest editor of the classics journal Ramus for a special issue on the topic of Senecan poetics. He co-authored the introduction and contributed an essay, “Retrospective Reading in Senecan Tragedy.” The essay examines each of Seneca’s plays and shows how the author encourages active re-reading of the plays through the incorporation of intertextual references.

  • Chris Trinacty and Andaleeb Banta Co-author Blog Post

    March 8, 2018

    Chris Trinacty, associate professor of classics, and Andaleeb Badiee Banta, curator of European and American art, co-authored a blog post highlighting how Oberlin College faculty utilize in their classes the resources available at Allen Memorial Art Museum.

  • Chris Trinacty Awarded Summer Residency

    March 7, 2018

    Chris Trinacty, associate professor of classics, was awarded a Margo Tytus Summer Residency Fellowship for summer 2018 at the University of Cincinnati in order to complete work on his book, A Commentary to Seneca’s Naturales Quaestiones III.

  • Christopher Trinacty Publishes, Gives Lectures

    November 21, 2017

    Christopher Trinacty, associate professor of classics, recently published two papers and gave two lectures. The first paper, “Tibullus’ Comedy: A note on Tib. 1.2.87-98” appears in the the latest volume of Mnemosyne, a journal devoted to classical philology. This paper shows how Tibullus defines the elegiac lover in part through allusions to Roman comedy. The second paper, “Horatian Contexts for Senecan Tragedy” appears in the edited volume, Seneca and Horace: Interactions, Intertexts, Interpretations. This essay reveals the reception of Horace’s odes in Seneca’s dramatic poetry.

    In October, Trinacty gave a lecture outside the walls of Pompeii as part of the Symposium Cumanum entitled “Therapeutic Strategies for Earthquake Survivors: Seneca, Caecilius Iucundus, and the Pompeiian Earthquake of 62/63 CE,” and he gave a talk entitled “Visions and Memories of Lucretius in Seneca’s Naturales Quaestiones” at the annual meeting of the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association.

  • Christopher Trinacty Gives Three Lectures

    May 4, 2017

    In April 2017, Assistant Professor of Classics Christopher Trinacty gave three lectures. The first, “Wild Nothing: Teaching Latin Intertextuality,” was presented at the annual Classical Association of the Middle West and South meeting in Kitchener, Ontario. This lecture detailed the way Trinacty uses pop music to discuss allusion in Latin poetry. A second paper, “Intertext to Intratext in Senecan Prose and Poetry,” was given at the Midwest Classical Literature Consortium in Athens, Ohio. This talk analyzed the way that Seneca the Younger utilized intertexts in different manners in his prose and poetry. The final talk, “C.H. Sisson in Exile,” was given as part of the conference Revisiting C.H. Sisson: Modernist, Classicist, Translator, at Kings College, London. This paper pointed out certain aspects of the reception of Ovid’s exile poetry in the works of the English poet C.H. Sisson.

  • Chris Trinacty Presents and Publishes

    December 12, 2016

    Assistant Professor of Classics Chris Trinacty gave two papers at the University of Cincinnati on October 4 and 5, 2016. The papers, “Humanius est deridere vitam quam deplorare: Seneca on Comedy” and “Earthquakes and Trauma: Seneca’s Naturales Quaestiones 6” will be featured in edited volumes.

    Chris also recently published an article “Intertextual Translation in Seneca, Ovid, and Hughes” in the Classical Receptions Journal. The article investigates how these poets use translation to position themselves in relation to their poetic predecessors.

  • Christopher Trinacty Publishes

    March 30, 2016

    Assistant Professor of Classics Christopher Trinacty recently published a chapter in the edited volume Roman Drama and its Contexts. The volume features many of the leading scholars in Roman comedy and tragedy. Trinacty's piece, "Tragic Translatio: Epistle 107 and Senecan Tragedy," examines Seneca's translation practices in his prose and poetic works. Trinacty argues for the importance of intratextual and intertextual clues for understanding Seneca's hermeneutics of translation in the piece.

  • Chris Trinacty Publishes Essay, Book Review

    February 23, 2016

    Assistant Professor of Classics Chris Trinacty has published the essay Imago Res Mortua Est: Senecan Intertextuality" in Brill's Companion to the Reception of Senecan Tragedy, an edited volume on the reception of Senecan tragedy. The essay establishes the importance of intertextuality for understanding Seneca's relationship to his literary, philosophical, and rhetorical predecessors.

    Trinacty also published a book review on E.M. Young’s Translation as Muse: Poetic Translation in Catullus’s Rome in the Classical Journal online.

  • Christopher Trinacty Writes Book Chapter, Book Reviews

    February 20, 2015

    Christopher Trinacty, assistant professor of classics, contributed a chapter on Senecan tragedy to the recently published book The Cambridge Companion to Seneca. The chapter investigates the competing methodologies for the understanding of Senecan tragedy, with suggestions for possible ways to resolve these views.

    Trinacty also recently published book reviews for the Bryn Mawr Classical Review (BMCR) and the Ancient History Bulletin.

  • Christopher Trinacty Publishes, Presents

    June 30, 2014

    Assistant Professor of Classics Christopher Trinacty recently published his first book, Senecan Tragedy and the Reception of Augustan Poetry, about the relationship between Seneca's dramatic poetry and the poetry of the previous generation with the Oxford University Press.  He also presented a paper entitled "Tragic Translatio and Allusive Aemulatio in Senecan Drama" at the 8th Trends in Classics International Conference in Thessaloniki, Greece.

News

A Conversation with Chris Trinacty

November 30, 2017
Assistant Professor of Classics Chris Trinacty on falling in love with Seneca’s tragedies, teaching the discipline through digital humanities, and his favorite Latin expressions.