• Professor of Psychology and Environmental Studies
Contact
  • Severance Hall 211
  • 440-775-8499
  • Monday 1:30-2:30 p.m.; Tuesday 3:00-4:00 p.m. and by appointment.

Education

  • Bachelor of Arts, Williams College, 1991
  • Master of Science, Univ. Massachusetts Amherst, 1996
  • Doctor of Philosophy, Univ. Massachusetts Amherst, 2000

Biography

I am a social and environmental psychologist with a strong interest in statistics. I teach social psychology, and an advanced seminar on the psychology of social conflict. My research focuses broadly on humans’ relationship with the natural world, with an emphasis on promoting sustainable behavior. Past research in collaboration with Steve Mayer suggests that both individuals and the environment benefit when people feel connected to the natural world. With John Petersen, Rumi Shammin, and Deborah Roose I study the potential for feedback technology (www.oberlindashboard.org ) to encourage conservation behavior, connect humans back to the natural world, and promote systems thinking. I also direct the Community Based Social Marketing Research Project, a collaborative research program between faculty, students and staff to develop, test and promote behavior change programs that reduce Oberlin College’s carbon emissions.

Faculty Notes

  • Cindy Frantz Quoted on Climate Change Communication

    December 19, 2016

    Professor Cindy Franz is quoted in Yale Climate Connections on climate change communication.

  • Cindy Frantz Publishes, Gives Invited Talk

    September 11, 2015

    The article “An Examination of Gender Differences in the American Fisheries Society’s Peer Review Process,” co-authored by Professor of Psychology Cindy Frantz and Grace Handley ’12, has been published in the September issue of Fisheries, an American Fisheries Society publication. According to Frantz, she and Handley found gender differences but no evidence for gender bias on the part of editors and reviewers.

    Frantz also delivered the invited talk "Metaphors as Magic Bullets? Harnessing Psychological Science to Promote Sustainability" on September 7 at Davidson College.

  • Cindy Frantz American Psychological Association Convention Talks

    August 27, 2015

    Professor of Psychology Cindy Frantz gave two talks in August at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association in Toronto.

    The first talk, “Using Technology to Transform Environmental Norms, Identity, and Behavior,” was part of a symposium with David Miller, Toronto mayor from 2003-2010 and current World Wildlife Fund Canada president and CEO. The second talk, “What Is Systems Thinking and How Shall We Measure It? An Introduction,” was part of a symposium Frantz chaired, titled “The psychology of systems thinking: Implications for decision making, policy, and practice.”

  • Cindy Frantz Gives Talk

    July 9, 2015

    Professor of Psychology Cindy Frantz gave the talk "Harnessing the most powerful drivers of human behavior to promote wildlife conservation" at the USC Conference on Conservation, Computation, & Criminology (C4) on June 29, 2015, in Washington DC. The talk discussed how powerful motivations that are not in individuals’ economic or biological best interests can be harnessed to promote the protection of forests, fisheries, and wildlife.

  • Cindy Frantz Gives Talks, Receives Grant

    April 28, 2015

    Professor of Psychology Cindy Frantz, currently a visiting scholar at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand, has given two invited talks at her host university.

    The first talk, titled “Environmental Dashboard: Combining public displays of real-time resource use with community voices to engage, empower, and celebrate stewardship” was given at University of Otago’s Centre for Sustainability's seminar series on April 16. The second talk, titled “Why do humans benefit from nature? An argument for the need to belong.” was given at the University of Otago’s Psychology Seminar series on April 20.

    Frantz—along with Paul Thibodeau, assistant professor of psychology; John Petersen, director of environmental studies and Paul Sears Distinguished Professor of environmental studies; and Rumi Shammin, associate professor of environmental studies—has also been awarded a National Science Foundation grant from the Decision, Risk, and Management Sciences program for $329,325.

    The grant focuses on systems thinking, a way of conceptualizing reality and making decisions that emphasizes relationships and interdependencies. Their research will empirically test the contention that systems thinking improves decision making. It will also test whether mental models, such as metaphors, can induce a systems thinking mindset and whether decision makers must value the system in question for systems thinking to have beneficial effects on decision making.

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