Campus News

Exam Period Shout Outs

May 15, 2013
Marvin Krislov
Photo credit: John Seyfried

Today marks the beginning of spring semester final examinations. I wish everyone the best of luck with their finals and their papers. This is, of course, a particularly stressful time. Please be sure to take care of your mental and physical health. There are a range of stress-relieving activities available. And taking study breaks, such as a brisk walk around campus or doing yoga in Wilder Bowl, can help relieve the academic pressure.

While the work load at Oberlin is heavy, the rewards for our students can be great. I am delighted to report that Oberlin students have achieved unprecedented success in receiving Fulbright Fellowships. So far we have won 15 Fulbright awards and 14 have been accepted. Another eight Oberlin students remain on the alternate list. According to our records this is the highest total ever awarded to Oberlin. Congratulations to our students, their faculty advisors and mentors, and Dean of Studies Kathryn Stuart and her staff on this brilliant showing.

I also want to give a big shout-out to our student-athletes, our coaches, and our athletics staff, especially those involved with our baseball and women’s tennis teams, which have posted some historic results.

This past weekend, the baseball team concluded one of the best season in Oberlin history by making their first-ever trip to the North Coast Athletics Conference Tournament. The Yeomen finished third overall, defeating Denison, suffering a heart-breaking, one-run loss to Allegheny, and losing to a very tough team from the College of Wooster.

The team finished 22-21 on the year and set a slew of school records: most wins (22), most NCAC wins (11), hits (438), at-bats (1,396), runs (298), RBI’s (258), doubles (79) and games played (43).

Now the post-season accolades are rolling in. Coach Adrian Abrahamowicz was named NCAC Coach of the Year. Sophomore Andrew Hutson was named to the All-NCAC First-Team. Sophomore Jeff Schweighoffer was named to the All-NCAC Second-Team, while junior Mike McDonald and senior Eric Knight were honorable-mention selections. Thanks and congratulations to Coach Abrahamowicz and the team for a thrilling year!

Our women’s tennis team, led by Coach Constantine Ananiadis, had another fine year. Earlier this week, senior Farah Leclercq became the first woman in school history to be named Intercollegiate Tennis Association Central Region Senior Player of the Year. She was also named North Coast Athletic Conference Player of the Year, and she will be competing in the NCAA Individual Championship Tournament taking place May 23 to 25 at Kalamazoo College. Congratulations and best of luck, Farah!

Last but not least, a reminder to seniors that between finals and Commencement comes fun—Senior Week! Enjoy the many events. I look forward to seeing you at the ice cream social and the Senior Supper.

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