• Associate Professor of English

Education

  • BA, Tel Aviv University, 1996
  • MA, Princeton University, 2002
  • PhD, Princeton University, 2006

Biography

Natasha Tessone’s research and teaching interests include 18th- and 19th-century literature, Romantic poetry, theories of the novel, Irish and Scottish literature, the Scottish Enlightenment, nationalism in literature, and postcolonial theory. Her articles and reviews have appeared in such journals as ELH, Studies in Romanticism, Studies in the Novel, Eighteenth-Century Fiction, and Èire-Ireland. Her book, Disputed Titles: Ireland, Scotland, and the Novel of Inheritance, 1798-1832 (Bucknell University Press, 2015), argues for the centrality of inheritance—often impeded, disrupted inheritance—to the novel’s rise to preeminence in Britain during the Romantic period.

  • Evan Gottlieb. Walter Scott and Contemporary Theory (Bloomsbury Academic: London and New York, 2013). (Review, forthcoming in Studies in the Novel.)
  • "Tending to the (National) Economy: Walter Scott's The Antiquary and 'that happy commerce' of the Enlightenment." Eighteenth-Century Fiction 26.2 (Winter 2013-14): 261-80.
  • Fiona Robertson, ed. The Edinburgh Companion to Sir Walter Scott. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2012. British Association for Romantic Studies Bulletin and Review 42 (June 2013): 23-24. (Review.)
  • "Entailing the Nation: Inheritance and History in Walter Scott's The Antiquary." Studies in Romanticism 51.2 (Summer 2012): 149-77.
  • Ian Duncan. Scott’s Shadow: The Novel in Romantic Edinburgh. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2007. Studies in the Novel 41.4 (Winter 2009): 490-92. (Review.)
  • "'Homage to the empty armour': Maria Edgeworth's Harrington and the Pathology of National Heritage." ELH 75 (Summer 2008): 439-69.
  • "Displaying Ireland: Lady Morgan and the Politics of Spectacular Antiquarianism." Eire-Ireland 37 (2002): 169-87. 

  • Book manuscript: Disputed Titles: Inheritance and the Case of the British Novel, 1798-1832.
  • Journal article: "According to Whose Rules of Engagement?: Scott, Wordsworth, and the Question of Literary Canon."