Oberlin College has several merit-based scholarships for which eligible international students may be considered.

For more information about these scholarships, contact the admissions office.

Eduardo Chivambo Mondlane Scholarship

The Eduardo Chivambo Mondlane Scholarship continues the outreach that enabled Mr. Mondlane to attend Oberlin College. Successful candidates will be offered up to a full-tuition scholarship for four years.

Eligibility

Any citizen from a sub-Saharan African country who is applying to Oberlin College of Arts and Sciences is eligible.

Application

There is no separate application for the Mondlane Scholarship, apart from the regular admissions application.

Selection

The Oberlin College Office of Admissions will select Mondlane Scholars. Criteria for selection include a strong academic record and the potential to excel within an American liberal arts curriculum. This award does not require any supplementary materials.

About Eduardo C. Mondlane (1919-1969), Oberlin Class of 1953

In fall 1951, a tall, charismatic man transferred to Oberlin College from the University of Lisbon. Thirty-two years earlier, Eduardo Mondlane had been born in a peasant village in Portuguese, East Africa, the son of a tribal chief. He attended Witwatersrand University in South Africa until forced to withdraw by the new apartheid government. Interested in the fate of his native land, Mondlane went to Portugal to study. Finding discrimination there as well, he secured a scholarship to study in the United States. What he was to call his "American Decade" began with a B.A. at Oberlin College, followed by an M.A. at Northwestern University, and a Ph.D. at Harvard. His academic field was anthropology; his field of action became African Politics.

Mondlane worked as a research officer in the Trustee Department of the United Nations, a position that led him back to Africa and, in 1962, to Dar Es-Salaam, where he took the lead in developing national liberation movement in Mozambique. Tragically, he was denied the fruits of his vision by his assassination in 1969 in Dar Es-Salaam. Mozambique attained independence in 1975.

Mondlane's cosmopolitanism, his marriage to a white American woman, and his American education, rendered him particularly suited to forge a broad and inclusive nationalist movement. It is significant that he began his American education with a degree from a liberal arts college, one whose motto at the time was "Think one person can change the world?"

Eduardo Mondlane became a prominent force in changing the political landscape of Africa. It is wholly appropriate that Oberlin College established a scholarship in his name and memory to enable another African student to follow in his path and fulfill his dream of a world of peace and justice.

Edwin O. Reischauer Scholarship

The Ambassador Edwin O. Reischauer Scholarship fosters Japanese-American understanding and cooperation. Successful candidates will be offered up to a full-tuition scholarship for four years at Oberlin College. Reischauer Scholars will be educated in the liberal arts and committed to international understanding.

Eligibility

Any Japanese national who has been accepted for admission to the Oberlin College of Arts and Sciences is eligible for this award.

Application

There is no separate application for the Reischauer Scholarship, apart from the regular admissions application.

Selection

The Oberlin College Office of Admissions will select Reischauer Scholars. Criteria for selection include a strong academic record and the potential to excel within an American liberal arts curriculum. This award does not require any supplementary materials.

About Edwin O. Reischauer (1910-1990), Oberlin class of 1931

President John F. Kennedy in 1961 made an unusual appointment. Rather than nominate a career diplomat as the American ambassador to Japan, he nominated a scholar and teacher of Japanese and East Asian history: Edwin O. Reischauer. In addition to representing the interests of the United States, Reischauer saw the ambassadorship as an opportunity to mediate between what he called his “two homelands,” and to build “an equal partnership” between two industrial nations across the barriers of language, culture, race, and history. Today, the partnership he built is a crucial source of stability in world affairs.

Described by the Washington Post as “the most successful Ambassador to Japan,” Reischauer was born in Japan to missionary parents. His father was a professor at Meiji Gakuin University, and his mother founded the Japan School for the Deaf in Machida. Upon graduating from the American School in Japan, he enrolled at Oberlin College and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in history. He earned a Ph.D. at Harvard University, where he became a professor of Japanese studies and director of the Harvard Yenching Institute.

After the death of his first wife, Reischauer married Haru Matsukata. Like her husband, Matsukata was educated in both countries, and worked to develop “better understanding and peace between my two countries.” While many circumstances contributed to Ambassador Reischauer’s success, it is significant that he earned an American liberal arts degree. By enabling a Japanese student to follow this same path, the Ambassador Edwin O. Reischauer Scholarship is a fitting memorial to a significant American friend of Japan.

Yakubu Saaka Memorial Fund

The Yakubu Saaka Memorial Fund was established with gifts received in memory of Yakubu Saaka, longtime Oberlin College Professor of African American Studies. Successful candidates will be offered awards of $10,000 for four years.

Eligibility

Any citizen from Africa who is applying to Oberlin College of Arts and Sciences is eligible.  

Application

There is no separate application for the Yakubu Saaka scholarship, apart from the regular admissions application.

Selection

The Oberlin College Office of Admissions will select Yakubu Saaka Scholars. Criteria for selection include a strong academic record and the potential to excel within an American liberal arts curriculum. This award does not require any supplementary materials.

About Yakubu Saaka

Dr. Yakuba Saaka served as a devoted and longtime professor of African American Studies at Oberlin from 1972-2008.  For several generations of Oberlin students, his courses on African politics and cosmology were staples in understanding African culture and tradition. 

A prolific scholar, Dr. Saaka published three books and many scholarly articles, and for many years authored the Collins Encyclopedia entry on Ghana. A specialist in African politics, Dr.Saaka practiced what he preached: he served in Ghana's Third Republic as a member of Parliament, as deputy foreign minister, and as a United Nations ambassador while on sabbatical from Oberlin. 

He renewed his commitment to Ghanaian national politics by declaring his intent to run for president in the 2008 elections.  Oberlin is proud to offer a scholarship in his name to celebrate his life and extraordinary career.