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Theater and Dance

The Theater and Dance Program offers students an interrelated series of courses and performance activities designed to provide a sound liberal arts grounding in the theory and practice of the arts of theater and dance. The program is designed to foster a sense of community among faculty, staff, and students. Because the performing arts are collaborative by nature, students involved in the program are expected to participate in all aspects of production, both artistic and technical. The major objectives of the program are:
a. To provide a critical understanding and enhanced appreciation for theater and dance arts and their relationships to other areas of liberal arts learning.
b. To encourage interdisciplinary artistic collaboration and studies with such related disciplines as English, art, black studies, creative writing, German and Russian, music, Romance languages, and others.
c. To provide concentrated preparation in dance and theater for students wishing to pursue advanced studies or professional careers.
d. To provide practical experiences in all aspects of production, both on and back stage.
The introductory level courses are open to all students interested in broadening the scope of their education or who are majoring in a related field and wish to use theater or dance as a resource. Students wishing to pursue more intensive involvement in the arts are encouraged to enroll in intermediate and advanced-level courses in technique along with courses in production, history, and the aesthetics of theater and dance. Students also have the opportunity to work closely with a number of artists-in-residence each year. Choreographers, guest directors, playwrights, and specialists offer workshops lasting from a few days to one month.

Honors
. In the second semester of the junior year qualified students may be admitted to the honors program in theater or dance. The honors project may be either, 1) an advanced-level creative project in acting, directing, design, dance performance, or choreography, or, 2) a research topic in theater or dance history, criticism, and theory resulting in a substantial written thesis. Advanced-level creative projects in acting, dance performance, choreography, directing, and design also include a significant written component. At the completion of the senior honors project, the student is examined orally by a panel consisting of the honor student's faculty advisor and at least two other faculty members. Applications and further information concerning honors work in either theater or dance are available in the Theater and Dance Program office, Warner Center.

Major and Non-Major Off-Campus Study
. Before credit is awarded for off-campus study, students must obtain tentative prior approval from a member of the Theater and Dance faculty and the Associate Dean for Student Academic Affairs. After the study is completed, the student must supply evidence of satisfactory participation. A maximum of 19 hours of off-campus study may be applied to the majors in Theater and Dance.

GLCA Arts Program in New York
. A semester of work, ordinarily in the junior year, in the areas of technique, performance, production, and related studies. In the past, the GLCA Program has placed students with various theater companies, film and video studios, major dance studios, dance-presenting organizations, dance critics, and stage designers. Students who successfully complete the GLCA Program earn credits upon payment of the Transfer of Credit fee. All arrangements for transferring credit must be made with a member of the theater or dance faculty and approval for an Academic Leave of Absence must be granted by the Associate Dean for Student Academic Affairs before a student begins the GLCA Program.

National Theater Institute at the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center
. This one-semester program at the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center in Connecticut is designed to acquaint the serious student of the theater with the demands and expectations of the theater profession. The program combines the liberal arts philosophy of studies in a wide range of disciplines with exposure to professional production standards. Students participate in classes in acting, directing, design, movement/improvisation, and playwriting, as well as adjunct courses and special workshops led by guest artists. The remainder of each semester is devoted to workshops focusing on one or more specific theatrical exercises. NTI also runs the NTI/Moscow Art Theater Program (MXAT)
-- an intensive one-semester training program in Moscow at the Moscow Art Theater School. Oberlin students wishing to attend N.T.I. must first be nominated by the Theater faculty. Final admission decisions are made by the N.T.I. staff.

Trinity/LaMaMa Performing Arts Program in New York
. An intensive, one-semester Oberlin College Affiliated Program emphasizing interdisciplinary work in theater and dance that includes internships, seminars, studio classes and attendance at 45+ performances and events. Fall semester only. Interviews are conducted on campus in February by the director, Damyan Popchrisrtov. Full semester's credits through Trinity College, Harford, CT.

Winter Term
. Winter Term provides an opportunity for students to engage in projects sponsored by the faculty in dance, film, acting, directing, design, and dance or theater research. Normally, several on-campus Winter Term theater productions are in rehearsal during the month. Guest artists are brought in from time to time to work with students in areas such as dance, fencing, voice, and acting. In addition, students use the time to become active in various alumni and off-campus theater, dance, film, and video internships.
The following faculty are willing to sponsor Winter Term projects as indicated. Ms. Cooper Albright: dance, performance and text; theory and criticism. Mr. Copeland: history and criticism in dance and theater; playwriting; performance. Mr. Flaharty: costume design; makeup; design research. Ms. Groseth: lighting and sound design, sound recording. Mr.Grube: scene design; painting; graphics. Ms. Jackson Smith: acting; directing; writing/dramatic literature other performance projects. Ms. Jobe: stage management. Ms. Martynuk: dance; choreography; performance. Mr. McAdams: dance with video and/or computers; kinesiology; massage. Mr. Moser: acting; directing. Ms. Rosasco: dance; choreography; performance.

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Theater

The Theater curriculum offers courses each year in acting, directing, history, criticism, design, and production. In addition to class meetings, many courses have a laboratory component that involves students in the process of creating a theater production. Each year, the Program produces two or three mainstage productions, and co-sponsors a black theater production directed by a faculty member appointed jointly in Theater and Dance and the African American Studies Department. Workshop productions and student directing projects are also regularly scheduled. These smaller scale productions are intended to provide a bridge between the classroom experience and the fully-mounted campus productions.
The Program also sponsors theater residencies from time to time. These residencies supplement the curriculum by giving students the opportunity to participate in workshops. In the past, these workshops have included work with specialists in stage combat, voice and movement, stage makeup, and film and video acting.
In addition to productions that are sponsored by the Theater and Dance Program, students have the opportunity to participate in productions sponsored by other departments and by campus student theater organizations.

Theater Major
. The student planning to major in theater must secure the approval for a plan of study (forms are available from the Program office) from a member of the faculty in the theater division. (Students planning to concentrate in performance must first successfully complete Thea-200.) The faculty member thereby agrees to act as the student's academic advisor. The major in Theater requires 25-26 hours in the Theater and Dance Program, 2 theater production labs, and nine credit hours in dramatic literature from other departments. Potential majors and minors are urged to complete the requirements in production and theater history in the first two years of study.
Listed below are the core requirements for a theater major. A student may select electives to provide an emphasis in acting/directing, history/criticism, film studies, or production/ design. The appropriate plan of study should be coordinated with the student's advisor before the end of the sophomore year. The courses required for the Theater major are as follows:

Theater Major
(34-35 total hours):
A. Core Requirements (25-26 hours):
History of the Western Theater (252, 253) 6 hours
Acting (Acting 107, 108) 3 hours
Production and design (three courses from among the
following: 172, 173, 174, 212, 222) 7-8 hours
B. Intermediate and advanced course electives 9 hours
C. Theater production labs (2 required) 0 hours
D. Nine hours of intermediate or advanced courses in dramatic literature 9 hours

Theater Minor
(14-15 hours):
A. History of the Western Theater (252, 253) 6 hours
B. Production and design (172, 173, 174, 212, 222) 2-3 hours
C. Six semester hours at the intermediate or advanced level in the
student's area of interest 6 hours

Spring Semester in Film at NYU's Tisch School of the Arts. A recently established affiliated program designed to offer Oberlin students a concentrated semester of study in either film production or film studies at New York University's internationally renowned film school. Students of all backgrounds are welcome. The program is offered in the spring semester only. Interested students should contact William Patrick Day, Associate Professor of English and Chair of the Interdisciplinary Committee on Film Studies, for application forms and detailed information about the program.

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Introductory Theater Courses

105. Exploring Acting 3 hours
3HU
This class is for upper-class, non-theater majors only. Students explore fundamental acting skills: observation, concentration, character, ensemble and text work. Interview times will be scheduled prior to beginning of classes. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 16.
Sem 1 THEA-105-01 MW 10:00-11:50 Ms. Armitage

108. Acting Techniques 3 hours
3HU
Explores fundamental acting techniques through improvisation and ensemble exercises. Intended for first- and second-year students. Auditions (prepare a short contemporary monologue) will be scheduled during orientation week for fall semester and the week directly preceding spring semester. Notes: CR/NE grading. Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently with THEA 199. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 16.
Sem 1 THEA-108-01 TuTh 10:00-11:50 Ms. Criste, Ms. Field
THEA-108-02 TuTh 1:00-2:50 Ms. Criste, Ms. Field
Sem 2 THEA-108-01 TuTh 10:00-11:50 Ms. Criste, Ms. Field
THEA-108-02 TuTh 1:00-2:50 Ms. Criste, Ms. Field


114. Speaking Shakespeare's Texts 1 hour
1HU
Next offered 2002-2003.

172. Production: Scenery 3 hours
3HU
Introduction to the technique and principles used in technical production for theater, dance, and opera. Lecture materials include: production management, stage rigging and mechanics, elements of the physical plant as well as construction methods used in building scenic units. Students participate in fabricating scenery for the semester's productions during Friday lab hours. Enrollment Limit: 15.
Sem 1 THEA-172-01 TuTh 10:00-10:50 Staff
F 1:30-4:20
Sem 2 THEA-172-01 TuTh 10:00-10:50 Staff
F 1:30-4:20

173. Production: Costumes 3 hours
3HU
An overview of the costuming process from the development of the costume design through the construction of the costume. Also includes seminars in costume crafts, shop management and fabrication. A three-hour weekly lab focuses on theatrical costume techniques and approaches. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 8
Sem 2 THEA-173-01 TuTh 10:00-11:50 Staff

174. Lighting Technology 2 hours
2HU
An introduction to lighting technology, terminology, and technique. Lectures cover equipment, manual and computer controlled lighting systems, distribution systems, electricity, lamps, reflectors, lenses and projection equipment. Some out-of-class times are required to complete projects. Enrollment Limit: 20.
Sem 1 THEA-174-01 TuTh 9:00-9:50 Lab TBA Ms. Groseth MODULE 1
Sem 2 THEA-174-01 TuTh 9:00-9:50 Lab TBA Ms. Groseth MODULE 1

199. Theater Production Lab 0 hours
0HU
Each enrolled student will serve on one technical/administrative crew for one of the theater, dance or opera productions during the semester: scenery, lighting, sound, costumes or publicity. Mandatory, one-time class meeting on the second Friday of the semester, 4:30-6:00 in Hall Annex 214.
Sem 1 THEA-199-01 To be arranged Ms. Jobe, Ms. Groseth, Staff
Sem 2 THEA-199-01 To be arranged Ms. Jobe, Ms. Groseth, Staff

 

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Intermediate Theater Courses

200. Scene Study: Acting 3 hours
3HU
A continuation of THEA 107/108, the focus of this class is on developing specific Stanislavsky-based techniques basic to the American acting tradition (conversational reality; executing activities; playing intentions) and applying these skills in scene work. Auditions in late spring. (A few slots will be held for fall auditions and transfers). Prerequisites: THEA 107/108 and a tech/design class. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.
Sem 1 THEA-200-01 TuTh 10:00-11:50 Mr. Moser
THEA-200-02 TuTh 1:00-2:50 Mr. Moser

201. Scene Study/Text Analysis 3 hours
3HU
This course will emphasize refining of the student's understanding of performance technique and theory. Class will serve as cast members for THEA 307 projects. Prerequisites: THEA 107/108 or THEA 200. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 18.
Sem 2 THEA-201-01 MW 10:00-11:50 Ms. Armitage
Lab F 10:00-11:50

212. Stage Management 3 hours
3HU
This course is an introduction to the practice of stage management for theater, dance, musical theater, and opera. Topics covered include organization, communication, interpersonal relations, the production process, rehearsal and performance procedures, and documentation. The course will culminate in a finished prompt book for a play. Consent of the instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 14.
Sem 1 THEA-212-01 TuTh 3:00-4:20 Ms. Jobe
Sem 2 THEA-212-01 TuTh 3:00-4:20 Ms. Jobe

213. Stage Management Practicum 2-4 hours
2-4HU
For student stage managers currently working on productions sponsored by the Theater and Dance Program. May be taken concurrently with THEA 212. Consent of instructor required.
Sem 1 THEA-213-01 To be arranged Ms. Jobe
Sem 2 THEA-213-01 To be arranged Ms. Jobe

222. Introduction to Design 3 hours
3HU
An introduction to designing for the performing arts. Lectures and readings cover elements of theater design, i.e., scenery, costumes, and lighting, used to express creative ideas. Projects provide a chance to experiment with the building blocks of design. Text analysis and concept also are covered from a visual perspective. A preliminary course to further studies in scene, costume, or lighting design. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.
Sem 1 THEA-222-01 TuTh 11:00-12:20 Mr. Flaharty, Mr. Grube

224. The Concept of the Avant-Garde 3 hours
3HU
A seminar examining the cultural and political forces of the late 19th and early 20th century which helped create an "adversary" relationship between "avant-garde" artists and middle-class society. The course focuses on those modernist movements that affected painting, literature, and theater. Major issues explored include the relationship of the avant-garde to radical politics as well as to popular culture and the mass communications media, the "fate" of the avant-garde in the age of post-modernism, and the current controversies surrounding NEA funding for the work of artists such as Robert Mapplethorpe. Enrollment Limit: 20.
Sem 1 THEA-224-01 TuTh 3:00-4:20 Mr. Copeland

225. Individual or Group Projects 1-4 hours
1-4HU
Intended for intermediate or advanced-level work by individuals and small groups not easily covered in the private reading option. Projects must be approved by the sponsoring faculty member before registration. Demands high student initiative and sustained individual work. Projects sponsored by Ms. Jobe, Mr. Copeland, Mr. Flaharty, Ms. Groseth, Mr. Grube, Ms. Jackson Smith and Mr. Moser. Consent of instructor required.

229. Autobiography and Performance 4 hours
4HU, CD
Next offered 2002-2003.

252, 253. History of the Western Theater 3 hours
3HU
A year-long lecture course tracing the evolution of the Western theater from Dionysian ritual in ancient Greece through contemporary performance practice in Europe and America. Theater architecture, works of dramatic literature, and theoretical treatises on performance are studied in relation to the social and intellectual history of each major era. Three historical periods receive special attention: the 5th century B.C. n Greece, the 17th century in England and France, and the 20th century in Europe and America. Prerequisites: THEA 252 and consent of instructor are prerequisites for THEA 253. Enrollment Limit: 35.
Sem 1 THEA-252-01 MWF 10:00-10:50 Mr. Copeland
Sem 2 THEA-253-01 MWF 10:00-10:50 Mr. Copeland

257. Introduction to Sound and Sound Design 3 hours
3HU
Introduction to the theory and technique of sound in the performing arts. Lectures cover basic sound theory, recording, system set-up, mixing, and design for the theater. Students will utilize lab equipment to learn the basics of audio production and to produce their own recordings. Basic midi, analog and digital recording/editing is covered. Some out-of-class lab times are required to complete projects. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.
Sem 1 THEA-257-01 TuTh 11:00-12:15 (Lab TBA) Ms. Groseth

260. Lighting Design 3 hours
3HU
Next offered 2002-2003.

264. African-American Drama 3 hours
3HU, CD
This class surveys plays written by black Americans with an emphasis on works of the late 20th century. An overview of the history of African-American performance is followed by reading and discussion of current criticism and a wide selection of plays by writers such as James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones), Adrienne Kennedy, Langston Hughes, Ntozake Shange, August Wilson, and George Wolfe. Requirements include papers, mid-term and scene work. Notes: This course may be used to fulfill the dramatic literature requirement for theater majors. Identical to AAST 264. Enrollment Limit: 20.
Sem 2 THEA-264-01 TuTh 10:00-11:50 Ms. Jackson-Smith

268. Black Arts Workshop 3 hours
3HU, CD
Identical to AAST 268.
Next offered 2002-2003.

271. Queer Acts 3 hours
3HU, CD, WR
Next offered 2002-2003.

281. Rehearsal and Performance 1-3 hours
1-3HU
Intermediate and advanced level work in preparation and public performances of a production directed by a member of the theater faculty. Fall production will be Tony Kushner's Angels In America (Part 1) directed by Ms. Armitage; spring production TBA, directed by Ms. Jackson-Smith. Notes: May be repeated once only for credit. CR/NE grading. Consent of instructor required.
Sem 1 THEA-281-01 To be arranged Ms. Armitage
Sem 2 THEA-281-02 To be arranged Ms. Jackson Smith

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Advanced Theater Courses

302. Happenings, Non-Literary Theater, and Performance Art 3 hours
3HU
Utilizing videotape excerpts from legendary productions, this course traces the evolution of "non-literary" theater in America from the 1960s to the 1990s. It begins by examining the "Theater of the Body" in the work of The Living Theatre and The Open Theatre; moves to more "painterly" theater pieces by Robert Wilson, and concludes with recent works of Mabou Mimes and The Wooster Group in which actor/audience participation is replaced by technological "mediation." Enrollment Limit: 20.
Sem 2 THEA-302-01 TuTh 3:00-4:20 Mr. Copeland

303. Private Instruction in Directing 1-3 hours
1-3HU
Closely supervised study and application of the principles of stage directing. The student must gain the approval of a faculty member who agrees to work with him/her. There will be readings and discussions leading to the planning, casting, rehearsing, and performing of a studio presentation. Prerequisites: THEA 307, stage management of a faculty-directed production. Notes: May be repeated once only for credit. Consent of instructor required.
Sem 1 THEA-303-01 To be arranged Mr. Copeland
THEA-303-02 TuTh 3:00-4:20 Mr. Moser
Sem 2 THEA-303-03 To be arranged Ms. Jackson Smith
THEA-303-04 TuTh 3:00-4:20 Mr. Moser

307. Directing (Texts and Concepts) 4 hours
4HU
Readings and assignments will focus on how form and function relate in a director's conceptualization process. Students will be introduced to different modes of analysis applied to plays spanning a variety of styles, and study how interpretations lead to key artistic choices. Students will compile a comprehensive production book of a one act play to be rehearsed and performed during the second module. Prerequisites: THEA 200. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 6.
Sem 2 THEA-307-01 MW 10:00-11:50 Mr. Moser
Lab F 10:00-11:50

308. Advanced Scene Study 3 hours
3HU
Drawing scenes from contemporary drama, this will be an intensive scene study and text analysis class, focusing on contemporary drama. Prerequisites: THEA 200. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.
Sem 1 THEA-308-01 MW 2:30-4:20 Ms. Field
Lab: F 2:30-4:20

310. Acting Verse 3 hours
3HU
This course introduces skills needed to perform poetic/verse texts (especially Shakespeare): imaging, phrasing, scansion, and rhetorical analysis. Students will apply them to sonnets, ssoliloquies and scene study. There are also assignments on Shakespeare's life, work and times. Auditions in late spring. Prerequisites: THEA 200, and any Shakespeare Literature class. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.
Sem 2 THEA-310-01 MWF 2:30-4:20 Mr. Moser

320. Special Projects: Design, Production, Stage or Arts Management 1-4 hours
1-4HU
Consent of instructor required.
Sem 1 THEA-320-01 To be arranged Mr. Flaharty
THEA-320-02 To be arranged Mr. Grube
THEA-320-03 To be arranged Ms. Groseth

341. Theater Production Seminar 1-4 hours
1-4HU
Student directors (including those receiving credit under THEA 303 & THEA 420) and designers will meet together weekly to discuss and monitor their projects through the various stages of production: script analysis, concept, design, casting, rehearsals, tech, and performance. Consent of instructor required. Theater and Dance approved student directors/designers.
Sem 1 THEA-341-01 TuTh 3:00-4:20 Mr. Grube, Mr. Moser
Sem 2 THEA-341-01 TuTh 3:00-4:20 Mr. Grube, Mr. Moser

362. Art on Trial 3 hours
3HU
Next offered 2002-2003.

365, 366. Voice and Movement 3 hours
3HU
A year-long training course in voice and movement for stage for the committed actor. The voice component will take an in-depth look at Catherine Fitzmaurice's voice technique. The movement component will survey specific movement techniques including Alexander, contact improvisation, and animal essences in the first semester and mask and clowning in the second semester. Consent by audition and instructor. Enrollment Limit: 12.
Sem 1 THEA-365-01 MWF 12:30-2:20 Ms. Criste
Sem 2 THEA-366-01 MWF 12:30-2:20 Ms. Criste

420. Honors Project 3-6 hours
3-6HU
Intensive independent work in theater on a research thesis or creative project to be decided upon in consultation with an advisor. Prerequisites: Admission to the Honors Program. Projects sponsored by Mr. Copeland, Ms. Jackson Smith, and Mr. Moser. Consent of instructor required.

995. Private Reading 1-3 hours
1-3HU
Projects sponsored by Ms. Armitage, Mr. Copeland, Mr. Flaharty, Ms. Groseth, Mr. Grube, Ms. Jackson Smith, Mr. Moser, and Mr. Zwegat. Consent of instructor required.

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Film Studies

Film Studies
Students with declared minors in Film Studies in Theater and Dance who have not yet fulfilled all requirements, as well as those students interested in exploring current options for a major or minor in Film Studies, should contact William Patrick Day, Associate Professor of English and Chair of the newly formed Interdisciplinary Committee on Film Studies.

 

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Dance

The Oberlin Dance Program functions within the liberal arts tradition. Though many of the students go on to be successful dancers and choreographers, the emphasis in the department is on encouraging students to create, perform, and think about movement in a manner that is consonant with their experience in the other fine and liberal arts.
Dance at Oberlin is also characterized by its commitment to experimentation and to the creation of original work. Each year at Oberlin, there are many dance performances involving students, faculty, and visiting artists. Both student and faculty choreography is shown throughout the year in formal concerts, and in a regular series of studio events. Students who wish to involve themselves in collaborations with dancers (as composers, sculptors, etc.) may enroll in a dance production project or participate in studio concerts. (In this regard, the Art Department and the Conservatory of Music as well as the Theater and Dance Program serve as valuable resources for dancers.) The program encourages an intelligent and sensitive approach to dance, in both participants and viewers.

Dance Major
. Students planning to major in dance must secure the approval for a program of study from a member of the faculty in the dance division. The faculty member thereby agrees to act as the student's academic advisor. The major in dance requires 34-39 credit hours in courses within the Theater and Dance Program. It is recommended that students complete the core requirements and select their areas of concentration, in coordination with their advisors, early in the major.
The requirements for the dance major follow. The 34-39 total credit hours for the dance major reflect 19-20 hours in core courses, 11-13 hours in a chosen area of concentration, and 4-6 hours in elective courses.

Dance Major
(34-39 hours):
A. Core Courses (19-20 hours):
Two semesters of Modern Dance Technique, any level 4 hours
Two semesters of Dance History 6 hours
Choreography I 4 hours
Improvisation I or Contact Improvisation 2-3 hours
One course in the area of design and production 3 hours
Theater 199, Production Lab 0 hours
B. Courses in areas of concentration (11-13 hours):
Listed below are three defined areas of concentration; students select one area or may formulate their own areas within which to focus, and petition the dance faculty for approval.
1. Theory :
a. Students must select at least three courses from the following:
Dance courses - 150, 203, 214, 230, 250, 270, 273, 350.
Theater courses - 224, 268, 302, 362.
b. 402. Independent Theory Project
2. Performance:
a. Three courses selected from the following: 191, 200, 203, 212, 300, 332
b. 221. Body Re-education and Alignment
c. 303 or 403.
3. Choreography:
a. Select three courses from the following: 211, 230, 332, 390, 395
b. 404. Independent Choreography Project
C. Elective Courses (4-6 hours): Select courses from within the Theater and Dance Program yet outside your area of concentration.

Dance Minor
A student planning to minor in dance must secure the approval of a program of study from a member of the faculty in the dance division. The minor in dance requires 15-16 credit hours in dance courses within the Theater and Dance Program.
The courses required for the dance minor are:
Dance Minor (15-16 hours):
A. Core Courses (7-8 hours):
1. One semester of Modern Dance Technique, any level
2. One semester of Dance History
3. Improvisation I or Contact Improvisation
B. Elective Courses (8 hours):
The remaining eight credits must be selected from dance courses within the Theater and Dance Program. One course must be at a non-introductory level.
All Dance majors and minors are required to register for their required courses during the first registration period of a given semester. Only courses requiring a placement class or audition are exempt from this rule.

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Introductory Dance Courses

100. Modern Dance I 2 hours
2HU
Introduction to basic physical/intellectual principles of modern dance technique with an emphasis on the development of the body as an instrument of expression. Students on the wait list must attend the first class meeting in order to be considered for any openings. Notes: May be repeated for credit. Enrollment Limit: 25.
Sem 1 DANC-100-01 TuTh 10:00-11:50 Ms. Rosasco
DANC-100-02 TuTh 3:00-4:20 Staff
Sem 2 DANC-100-01 MWF 12:50-2:20 Ms. Rosasco
DANC-100-02 TuTh 3:00-4:20 Staff
113. Ballet I 2 hours
113. Ballet I 2 hours
2HU
Introduction to classical ballet with an emphasis on alignment, injury prevention, and expression. Attendance at three to five performances is required. Notes: May be repeated for credit. Pre-registration is limited to 20. (Additional spaces are reserved for first- and second-year students.) A student on a wait list must attend first class meeting in order to be considered for any openings. Enrollment Limit: 25.
Sem 2 DANC-113-01 TuTh 11:00-12:30 Ms. Rosasco

118. Ritual and Performance I 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR
Identical to AAST-118.
Sem 1 DANC-118-01 TuTh 11:00-12:15 Ms. Sharpley

132. Contact Improvisation 3 hours
3HU
The points of contact -- visual, physical, rhythmic, emotional -- set up the physical meeting ground for dancing. In this class we will acquire the physical skills (such as rolling, learning when and when not to give weight, how to receive weight, and how to fall softly) in order to facilitate a conscious, engaged dancing with one other. Notes: May be repeated for credit. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 28.
Sem 1 DANC-132-01 MWF 12:30-2:20 Ms. Cooper Albright

150. Dance History: Cross-Cultural Approaches to Dance 3 hours
3HU, CD, WR
The course is a cross-cultural survey of selected dance forms from Asia, Europe, and the Americas. The purposes of this course are: to guide students into an awareness of how to situate and think about the dances that they see and make; to familiarize themselves with important historical moments in dance; to teach them how to ask pertinent questions about unfamiliar forms of dance; and to give students the exposure to primary sources and the practice of writing dance history themselves. Enrollment Limit: 20.
Sem 2 DANC-150-01 TuTh 10:00-11:50 Ms. Cooper Albright

190. West African Dance Forms in the Diaspora I
Identical to AAST-190.
Next offered 2002-2003.

191. West African Dance Forms in the Diaspora II
Identical to AAST 191.
Sem 1 DANC-191-01 TuTh 9:00-10:50 Ms. Sharpley

195. Jazz Improv 2 hours
2HU,CD
Next offered 2002-2003.

 

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Intermediate Dance Courses

200. Modern Dance II 2 hours
2HU
A continuation of dance technique for those who have successfully completed DANC 100 or the equivalent. Attendance at three to five performances of dance events or lectures over the course of the semester is required. Notes: May be repeated for credit. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 25.
Sem 1 DANC-200-01 MWF 11:00-12:30 Ms. Rosasco
Sem 2 DANC-200-01 MWF 11:00-12:30 Ms. Martynuk

203. Physical Mindfulness: Embodying Contemplative Practice 3 hours
3HU,WR
This course will progress from a study of the physical and spiritual implications of individual mindful practices (such as yoga and Body-Mind Centering), to practices that include a partner and witness, to the creation of collective rituals that address a community's specific needs. Through a variety of readings and discussions we will ask how contemplative practices might include other bodies and social experiences. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 15.
Sem 2 DANC-203-01 TuTh 1:00-2:45 Ms. Cooper Albright

207. Improvisation I 2 hours
2HU
Improvisation is the process of making choices within a given structure while moving and discovering the collective "choice" as it evolves. The class will go from highly defined structures to more open improvisations over the course of the semester. Solo and group structures will be used. Elements such as time, space, motion, shape, weight, focus, and range will be emphasized as key choices in this exploration. Prerequisites: DANC 100 or DANC 200. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 15.
Sem 2 DANC-207-01 MWF 1:00-2:20 Mr. McAdams

211. Production Project 1-2 hours
1-2HU
Individual or collaborative work based in performance. Open to dancers, musicians, poets, designers, etc. Students must observe the rules posted in Warner Center. Notes: May be repeated for a total of 6 credits. Consent of instructor required.
Sem 1 DANC-211-01 To be arranged Staff
(choreographers and designers)
DANC-211-02 To be arranged Staff
(composers and other creative contributors; performers: dancers, musicians, others).
Credit/No Entry.
Sem 2 DANC-211-01 To be arranged Staff
(choreographers and designers)
DANC-211-02 To be arranged Staff
(composers and other creative contributors; performers: dancers, musicians, others).
Credit/No Entry.

212. Ballet II 2 hours
2HU
Next offered 2002-2003.

214. Movement Education: The Art of Teaching in a Variety of Settings 3 hours
3HU
Next offered 2002-2003.

221. Body Re-education and Alignment 3 hours
3HU
This course focuses on the relationship of mind and body in affecting physical change to re-educate and align the body. A body-based language describing and analyzing movement, anatomy, and imagery is used in the movement sessions. Readings are assigned. Prerequisites: DANC 100 or DANC 113. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 15.
Sem 1 DANC-221-01 TuTh 8:15-9:50 Staff

222. Choreography I 4 hours
4HU
This class focuses on methods of generating material and shaping movement phrases toward the creation of solos and small group dances. Weekly studies are assigned, exploring the use of space, gesture, dynamics, rhythm, shape, and texture. Methods of composition include use of improvisation as well as an introduction to the basic forms of theme and variation, canon, and repetition. Readings, discussions, and performances are required. Prerequisites: DANC 100 and one semester of DANC 250 or DANC 150. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 10.
Sem 1 DANC-222-01 TuTh 1:00-2:45 Ms. Rosasco

230. Autobiography and Performance 4 hours
4HU, CD
Next offered 2002-2003.

250. Dance History: Dance in the 20th Century 3 hours
3HU, CD, WR
This course is designed as the first part of a year-long sequence investigating the role of dance in 20th century America. We will explore the way a variety of social and theatrical dances both shaped and were shaped by discourses of feminism, nationalism, African-American cultural identity, and modernism. Enrollment Limit: 25.
Sem 1 DANC-250-01 MW 9:00-10:50 Ms. Cooper Albright

270. Queer Acts 3 hours
3HU, CD, WR
Next offered 2002-2003.

273. Western Dance History and Aesthetics 3 hours
3HU
This course will trace the historical revolution of Western theatrical dance from its origins in the courts of aristocratic Europe through present-day America and Europe. Along the way, a number of theoretical questions will receive special consideration: the definition of dance, the differences between social and theatrical dance, the varied ways in which movement conveys meaning, the relationship of dance to the other arts, and the manner in which genres of dance ("ballet," "modern," "post-modern") are defined.
Sem 2 DANC-273-01 MW 3:00-4:20 Mr. Copeland

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Advanced Dance Courses

300. Modern Dance III 2 hours
2HU
A continuation of dance technique for those who have successfully completed DANC 200 or the equivalent. Attendance at three to five performances of dance events or lectures over the course of a semester is required. Notes: May be repeated for credit. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 25.
Sem 1 DANC-300-01 M-F 2:30-4:20 Guest Artist MODULE 1
Sem 2 DANC-300-01 MWF 11:00-12:30 Staff

303. Oberlin Dance Company 1-4 hours
1-4HU
Students will learn a faculty-choreographed dance for performance in Hall Auditorium. The course will emphasize rehearsal and performance techniques such as learning and retaining movement quickly and taking responsibility for expressively developing one's own role. Placement by audition the first week of classes. Notes: May be repeated for credit Consent of instructor required.
Sem 1 DANC-303-01 M-F 4:30-6:00 Guest Artist MODULE 1
Sem 2 DANC-303-01 TuTh 1:15:4:20 Ms. Martynuk
Mr. McAdams

311. Practicum in Dance 1-2 hours
1-2HU
Individual projects that are not performance-based, such as teaching or community service work. Notes: May be repeated for credit. Consent of instructor required.
Sem 1 DANC-311-01 To be arranged Staff
Sem 2 DANC-311-01 To be arranged Staff

332. Continuing Contact 3 hours
3HU, CD, WR
This course will build on the foundational skills acquired in DANCE 132. We will both deepen and expand our work in performance, creative and critical writing, and working with various differently-abled communities. Students interested in this course must be able to attend Sunday jams and various weekend events. Prerequisites: Contact Improv (Dance 132). Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 15.
Sem 2 DANC-332-01 MWF 2:30-4:20 Ms. Cooper Albright

350. Dance History: Contemporary Dance 3 hours
3HU, CD, WR
Next offered 2002-2003.

390. Collaborations: Dance, Art and Music 3 hours
3HU
Next offered 2002-2003.

391. Dance Diaspora
2HU, CD
Identical to AAST-391.
Sem 1 DANC-391-01 TuTh 9:00-11:00 p.m. Ms. Sharpley

395. Special Topics in Choreography 3 hours CR/NE
3HU
This is an upper-level composition course for the student interested in creating dances with text, site-specific work, or other student-initiated projects. May be repeated for credit. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.
Sem 2 DANC-395-01 M 7:00-10:00 Ms. Rosasco

 

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Independant Projects

First and second semesters. Final projects for Dance majors in their
different areas of concentration. All projects require consent of instructor.

402. Independent Theory Project 2 hours
2HU
Consent of instructor required.

403. Independent Performance Project 2 hours
2HU
Consent of instructor required.

404. Independent Choreography Project 2 hours
2HU
Consent of instructor required.

405. Independent Design Project 2 hours
2HU
Consent of instructor required.

420. Honors Project 3-6 hours
3-6HU
Intensive independent work in dance on a research thesis or creative project to be decided upon in consultation with an advisor. Prerequisites: Admission to the Honors Program. Projects sponsored by Ms. Cooper Albright, Ms. Martynuk, Mr. McAdams, and Ms. Rosasco. Consent of instructor required.

995. Private Reading 1-3 hours
1-3HU
Projects sponsored by Ms. Cooper Albright, Ms. Martynuk, Mr. McAdams and Ms. Rosasco. Consent of instructor required.

 

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Interdisciplinary Performance Major

The Theater and Dance Program at Oberlin has developed a new major entitled "Interdisciplinary Performance." This major is designed for the focused student who wishes to pursue an intensive course of study in both the critical and experiential aspects of a performance genre. It is also designed to allow for cross-disciplinary work in other complementary fields of inquiry such as African American performance traditions, performance art, TIMARA, women's studies, musical theater, video technology, and queer performance.
Students planning to major in Interdisciplinary Performance must first confer with a faculty member in the Theater and Dance Program to prepare a written proposal which includes a rationale and a specific course of study for the completion of the major. This proposal is then reviewed by the department members and the student will be informed of any necessary changes or amendments by her or his faculty advisor. Because the Interdisciplinary Performance major requires more advanced planning, it is important that students declare the major in the second semester of their sophomore year, although in some cases, the faculty will consider proposals as late as the first semester of junior year.
The Interdisciplinary Performance major requires 34-37 hours, at least 25 of which must be taken in the Theater and Dance Program. Every IPM must have a core that is grounded in the program's existing curriculum with a course of study that is designed to incorporate the minimal requirements for a minor in either Theater, Dance or Film. Six credits are required in each of the three main course categories: Critical Studies, Studio and Production, Creative Process and Artistic Direction. Six additional credits of elective courses must be taken in the department at a 200- or 300-level (including group and individual projects), and a senior project in scholarship and/or performance (1 to 3 credits) must be completed to finish the major. The remaining credits (9 to 10) may be taken either in the Theater and Dance Program or in another discipline relating to the student's particular major focus.


Course Categories:


Critical Studies
(courses in which the mode of inquiry is predominately critical or historical): History of Western Theater, African American Drama, Cinema and Society: Racial Stereotyping, American Cinema, European Cinema, Gender and Performance, Concept of the Avant-Garde, Happenings and Non-Literary Theater, Dance History: Cross-Cultural Approaches to Dance: Dance History: Dance in the 20th Century; Western Dance History and Aesthetics.

Studio and Production
(courses which ask the student to learn a specific technique or skill): Acting (all levels), Modern Dance (all levels), Ballet, West African Dance I and II, Improvisation, Contact Improvisation I and II, Voice and Speech, Movement for Actors, Basic Video, Video Projects, Scene Construction, Costume Construction, Stage Management, Body Re-Education, Movement Education.

Creative Process and Artistic Direction
: (courses which ask the student to engage with their own creative process in order to think about and produce performance works) Directing, Choreography, Light Design, Costume Design, Sound Design, Political Cabaret, Autobiography and Performance, Black Arts Workshop, Collaboratons: Dance, Art and Music, Oberlin Dance Company.

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