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Sociology

Sociology is concerned with the study of social phenomena -- the self, groups, community solidarity, economic and political behavior, inequality, culture and values, social organization, institutions -- in societies of various types and levels of development. The question of how groups, societies, and larger social systems change or remain the same over time frames work in the discipline. The department curriculum reflects the breadth of the discipline and responds to the variety of student interests. The curriculum addresses the educational objectives of students who wish to: (1) study for advanced degrees in Sociology as preparation for careers in teaching or research; (2) apply Sociology in the professions such as law or urban planning; (3) apply Sociology in public policy or social service agency work; (4) utilize Sociology to contribute to majors in other disciplines such as psychology, anthropology, history, or political science; (5) learn the ways in which the sociological imagination can increase and enrich one's participation in society. These different objectives may suggest different courses or combinations of courses so students thinking about majoring in the department should consult an advisor early in their decision process.
Major. A major in Sociology consists of:
1. A minimum of 30 hours in the department, including an introductory sociology course.
a. Required courses: 211 and 282. Students are strongly advised to take these courses by the end of their junior year, since advanced courses assume knowledge of material covered in them. Those considering Honors should know that they must have completed both courses to be eligible for the program.
b. At least one course from 3 of the 4 core analytic areas (see Distribution Requirements below).
c. At least one seminar in Sociology.
d. The 30 hours required for the major may include only one introductory course. Freshmen/Sophomore Colloquia may not be substituted for an introductory course but can be included in the 30 hours.
2. Students considering graduate or professional schools should emphasize quantitative studies and thus consider taking Math 113 or Math 100 (which can be counted toward the major).
3. Courses in many other disciplines add strength to a major in Sociology. The particular pattern of courses chosen will vary, depending on the plans and interests of the student. The pattern should be worked out in close consultation with the major advisor.
Related Course. The following can be counted toward the major:
MATH 113 (or)
MATH 100
Distribution Requirements. A major in Sociology should include courses from the various analytic areas which are the basis for organization of the field. The four core analytic areas are Social Organizations and Institutions, Social Inequality and Stratification, Microsociology/Individuals and Society, and Historical and Comparative Change. Below are listed the core analytic areas and the courses within each area. Each major should take at least one course from 3 of the 4 analytic areas.
Social Organizations and Institutions
237 Sociology of Religion
246 Sociology of Education
247 Contested Spaces: Schools and Universities in American Society
254 Political Sociology
271 The Sociology of Law and Legal Institutions
273 Criminology, Delinquency, and Legal Policy
326 The American Family: Comfort, Conflict and Criticism
331 Torts, Trials, and Trouble: The Social Origins of Law
434 Seminar in the Social Organization of Work: From Fast Food to the Fortune 500
446 Seminar on the City and Social Policy
472 Sociology of Law Seminar
Social Inequality and Stratification
215 Contemporary Asian Pacific American Experience
235 Gender Stratification
236 Sexualities and Society
248 Queer Theory and Social Change
260 Sociology of Asian American Communities
277 Race and Ethnic Relations
377 Advanced Topics in Race and Ethnic Relations
378 Sociology of the African American Community
436 Seminar in Sexuality and Collective Action
447 Asian Pacific American Women
443 Generation X: Relationship, Work, Culture, and Communication
Micro-Sociology: Individuals and Society
212 Street Smarts: Ethnographic Explorations of Urban America
222 Introduction to Social Psychology
285 Ethnographic Aspects of the World Capitalist System
320 Critical Ethnography and Urban Transformations in the U.S.
403 Seminar in Social Psychology: African-American Personality
Historical and Comparative Study of Social Change
207 Global Feminisms
217 Social Development in Brazil and Mexico
228 Immigration and Population in the U.S.
230 Social Change and Political Transformation in Eastern Europe
231 Social Change
241 Urban Sociology
354 Social Movements and Revolutionary Change
381 The Rise of the Networked Society: Technology's Impact on Social Life
404 Seminar: Intellectuals, Social Science and Politics in the Modern World
431 Seminar: The Making and Unmaking of Communist Ideals: Learning About Society Through Literature and Film
448 Seminar: Violence in America
Minor. The minor in Sociology consists of the following:
1. A minimum of 15 hours in the department, including credit for at least four courses
2. An introductory course. The 15 hours include one introductory course, but no more than one.
3. Either Sociology 211 - Social Research Methods or Sociology 282 - Social Theory.
Honors. The department invites a number of qualified majors to participate in the Honors program. To be eligible, students must have completed the two required courses, 211 and 282. Usually candidates for honors devote from three to five hours to independent work in each of their last two or three semesters. An examination, both written and oral, is given at the end of the senior year in the student's main fields of interest. Interested students are invited to discuss the program with their advisors or the chair of the department.
Off-Campus Programs for Credit. Students are encouraged to broaden their educational experience by taking advantage of off-campus programs, preferably sometime during their junior year. A maximum of nine credit hours of such work may be applied toward the major and requires prior approval of the department. Programs of interest include the Europe in Transition Program and the GLCA Philadelphia Center.
Transfer of Credit. Students who transfer credits in regular sociology courses taken at other institutions may, with the approval of the department, apply certain of such courses toward the major. The transfer of credits may be subject to the Transfer of Credit fee. Transfer student requests for credit for courses taken at their previous institutions are evaluated on an individual basis. Generally, transfer credit shall not exceed nine credit hours.
Private Reading. Students who have completed available courses in a subject may schedule a reading course in that subject during their junior or senior years. In some instances, reading courses in subjects not offered in the department may also be arranged. No more than one reading course may be scheduled in any semester, nor more than two during an undergraduate program.

 

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Introductory Courses

Any of the following courses serves as a prerequisite for upper-level courses.
104. Colloquium: She Works Hard for the Money: 3 hours
Women, Work and the Persistence of Inequality
3SS
Current U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports indicate that women who are employed full-time earn only 76.7% of what men who are employed full-time earn. In this course, we will explore the causes and consequences of gender based wage discrepancy. Topics to be covered include: occupational segregation, comparable worth, shift work, "the Mommy Track", gender based job queuing, career trends and unpaid labor. In addition to class reading, each student will choose an occupation and research it throughout the semester. Enrollment Limit: 16. Reserved for freshmen and sophomores.
Sem 1 SOCI-104-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Ms. John
121. Diversity, Justice, and the Sociological Imagination 3 hours
3SS
This course examines a series of issues concerning diversity and justice in American society and within core American institutions. Our goal is to develop a complex understanding of inequality and resistance, particularly as one form of diversity, i.e. racial, gender, physical ability, intersects with others. We survey key sociological thinkers and methods to engage and develop each student's own sociological imagination. Topics include: comparative race relations; immigration; gender studies; culture; education; and social movements. Enrollment Limit: 45. Priority given to freshmen and sophomores.
Sem 1 SOCI-121-01 MWF 12:00-12:50 Ms. Charfauros McDaniel
122. Principles of Sociological Thinking 3 hours
3SS
This course is an introduction to the discipline that will acquaint students with sociological concepts and methodology. Emphasis is placed on analyzing the components of society: from institutions to individuals, in keeping with Mills' "sociological imagination". Important issues addressed include the relationship between economy and institutions, stratification, and gender/racial-ethnic/class divisions. Current sociological literature is used to both introduce concepts and help students interpret scholarly writing. Emphasis will be placed on understanding social inequality and the link between the individual and social structure. Enrollment Limit: 45.
Sem 2 SOCI-122-01 MWF 9:00-9:50 Ms. John
123. Deviance, Discord, and Dismay 3 hours
3SS, WR
This course will examine a set of contemporary social debates, including crime, abortion, affirmative action, victims' rights, the social regulation of alcohol and drugs, family violence, gun control, and corporate and political corruption. Traditional sociological theories will be applied to these issues and the major figures in contemporary sociological thought will be juxtaposed against legal theories of social control and social integration. Enrollment Limit: 45. Notes: Thirty places held for freshmen.
Sem 1 SOCI-123-01 TuTh 8:00-9:15 Mr. Walsh
Sem 2 SOCI-123-01 TuTh 8:00-9:15 Mr. Walsh
124. Classics of Sociology 3 hours
3SS, WR
Modern sociology was born in the context of the transition from traditional to modern societies in the West. This dramatic transformation opened a whole series of new social and political problems which have defined the modern era. We will explore the ways some important founding figures of sociology analyzed such problems as individualism, alienation, lack of community, class conflict, and modern capitalism. We will address the relevance of classical sociology for contemporary issues and the students' personal experiences. Enrollment Limit: 45.
Sem I SOCI-124-01 TuTh 11:00-12:15 Mr. Vujacic
125. Sociological Analysis of Society 3 hours
3SS
Next offered 2002-2003.
126. Community and Inequality: An Introduction to Sociology 3 hours
3SS
This introduction to the study of societies focuses on two key issues--social inequality and community solidarity. These issues will organize our examination of important social phenomena: the self, race and ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual orientation, family and networks, the new immigration, urban poverty, social movements and the impact of globalization. We will also study theoretical and methodological issues related to these subjects. Enrollment Limit: 45. Priority given to freshmen and sophomores.
Sem I SOCI-126-01 TuTh 8:35-9:50 Mr. Norris

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Survey Courses in Specializations

211. Social Research Methods 4 hours
4SS, QPh, WR
This course introduces students to the analytical logic and skills required for research in sociology. Major emphasis is placed on teaching the research process, including library research, survey research, and statistical analysis. Information literacy goals are addressed, such as evaluating the appropriateness, reliability and accuracy of different types of information; developing familiarity with sources of available data; generating new data; and interpreting empirical information within a theoretical framework. As groups, students work on research projects throughout the semester. Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. Enrollment Limit: 40. Priority given to sociology majors.
Sem 1 SOCI-211-01 MWF 10:00-10:50 Ms. John
Laboratories
SOCI-211-02 M 3:30-4:20 Ms. John Limit 20
SOCI-211-03 W 3:30-4:20 Ms. John Limit 20
212. Street Smarts: Ethnographic Explorations of Urban America 3 hours
3SS
Next offered 2002-2003.
215. Contemporary Asian Pacific American Experience 3 hours
3SS
Next offered 2002-2003.
217. Social Development in Brazil and Mexico 3 hours
3SS, CD
Brazil and Mexico have gone through social, political and economic changes during the last decade which now lead many to regard them as industrialized and democratic nations. In this course we will systematically interrogate this characterization. The course is constructed to encourage systematic comparison of the two countries on a number of dimensions - location in
the global system, cultural patterns, inequalities (race and ethnic groups, class, women's issues, sexualities) and collective action, urbanization and industrialization, and state structures. We will frame the comparisons within theoretical debates. Enrollment Limit: 35.
Sem 1 SOCI-217-01 TuTh 1:30-2:45 Mr. Norris
222. Introduction to Social Psychology 3 hours
3SS
Social psychology is an area of study within sociology which examines the relationship between the individual and society. Specific emphasis is on the social experience stemming from individuals' participation in social groups, interactions with others, the effects of the cultural environment on both the social experiences and interactions with others, and the emergence of social structures from these interactions. From this perspective, we will examine several topics in social psychology such as socialization, identities and the self, attitude and attitude change, social perception, attributions, social order and conformity, language and social communication, and social behavior in groups. Prerequisites: One introductory sociology course or consent of instructor. Enrollment Limit: 35.
Sem 2 SOCI-222-01 MWF 9:00-9:50 Mr. White
228. Immigration and Population in the U.S. 3 hours
3SS
Next offered 2002-2003.
230. Social Change and Political Transformation in Eastern Europe 3 hours
3SS
This course focuses on Eastern Europe as the first relatively backward region in the world capitalist system. We will begin with some major theories of social change and a historical introduction to the region. Next, we will turn to communist revolutions, Stalinism, reform communism, the rise of dissent and the revolutions of 1989. Much of the course will be devoted to the post-communist era, attempts to build democracy and capitalism, and the rise of nationalism. Identical to POLT 214. Enrollment Limit: 35.
Sem 2 SOCI-230-01 MWF 3:30-4:20 Mr. Vujacic
233. Gender, Social Change, and Social Movements 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR
This course focuses on theoretical debates about processes of social change and social reproduction at the individual, cultural, and social movement levels, with particular focus on gender identities and status. Attention will be paid to how the "modernity/tradition" construct, and race, class, nation, and sexuality (as "differences" and as sources of inequality" impact these debates and influence definitions of self and representations of others. Priority of Women's Studies and Sociology majors. Prerequisites: WOST 100, introductory course in Sociology or Politics, or consent of instructor. Closed to first year students. Enrollment Limit: 30.
Sem 1 SOCI-233-01 MW 12:00-1:15 Ms. Hasso
235. Gender Stratification 3 hours
3SS, CD, QPh, WR
Next offered 2002-2003.
236. Sexualities and Society 3 hours
3SS, CD
Sexuality has moved to the center of societal debates. It informs yet subverts gender roles, provides the base for community and identity formation, threatens and is attacked by conservatives and the military. Increasingly multi-ethnic and multi-class, sexual minorities have emerged as political actors and culture shapers with impacts on elections, new family forms, and civil rights. These are some of the issues in this course. Prerequisites: One course in Sociology or consent of instructor. Enrollment Limit: 35.
Sem 2 SOCI-236-01 TuTh 1:30-2:45 Mr. Norris
241. Urban Sociology 3 hours
3SS
Globalization has led to the restructuring of the American metropolis in recent decades. New inequalities of gender, class, race/ethnicity, and sexualities have been produced. New urban forms have emerged as central cities and suburbs changed functions and inhabitants. Residential segregation increased among the poor while the middle sectors retreated into gated communities. Gentrification, the new urbanism, urban sprawl, community and housing, and the lack thereof (homelessness and the underclass) became concerns. In this course we will utilize a comparative theoretical approach to these issues. Prerequisite: One course in Sociology. Enrollment Limit: 35.
Sem 2 SOCI-241-01 TuTh 8:35-9:50 Mr. Norris
247. Contested Spaces: Schools and Universities in American Society 3 hours
3SS
Are schools and universities the ultimate path to upward mobility or is their main role to actively produce and reproduce inequality in society? This class critically examines conservative, liberal, and resistance-based accounts of the contradictory role of schools and universities in American society. Special attention is given to the racial, class and gendered hierarchies in education; critical pedagogy; and the institutionalization of "subaltern" studies (ethnic, women's, and queer studies). Prerequisites: One sociology course or consent of instructor. Enrollment Limit: 35.
Sem I SOCI-247-01 MWF 9:00-9:50 Ms. Charfauros McDaniel
254. Political Sociology 3 hours
3SS
This course is intended as an introduction to a major sub-field of sociology, the sociology of politics. We will begin with an examination of the birth of democratic politics in the contemporary Western world. We will touch on such problems as the social origins of democracy, the rise of political citizenship and the modern nation-state, class and elite conflict, lower-class social movements, and the political-cultural foundations of democratic politics. In the second part of the course we will concentrate on one of the major anti-liberal movements and regimes in the 20th century, Nazism. Enrollment Limit: 35.
Sem I SOCI-254-0l TuTh 3:00-4:15 Mr. Vujacic
260. Sociology of Asian Pacific American Communities 3 hours
3SS
By using sociological theories, this course traces the development and transformation of Asian Pacific American communities in the U.S. We will analyze how immigration restrictions, residential isolation, and economic segregation affected settlement patterns. Students will explore the strategies and resources APAS employ in structuring, maintaining and revitalizing their communities. We will examine how ongoing immigration transforms the ethnic, class, gender, and generational composition of this population and affects its ability to define and defy community boundaries. Prerequisites: One course in introductory sociology and/or Soc. 215. Enrollment Limit: 30.
Sem 2 SOCI-260-01 TuTh 11:00-12:15 Ms. Charfauros McDaniel
271. Sociology of Law and Legal Institutions 3 hours
3SS, WR
Attention is given to the development of legal norms and related institutions. Institutional analysis will be directed primarily toward courts, judges, prosecutors, lawyers and legal training, prisons and prison functionaries. Prerequisites: One introductory course in Sociology. Enrollment Limit: 30
Sem 2 SOCI-271-0l TuTh 11:00-12:15 Mr. Walsh
273. Criminology, Delinquency, and Legal Policy 3 hours
3SS, WR
This course will deal with sociological and legal inquiry into the origins and forms of juvenile delinquency, the etiology and forms of crime in adult populations, and the social and legal policy issues associated with crime and delinquency. Legal and social scientific resources will be examined. Prerequisites: One introductory course in Sociology or consent of instructor. Enrollment Limit: 30.
Sem 1 SOCI-273-01 TuTh 11:00-12:15 Mr. Walsh
277. Race and Ethnic Relations 3 hours
3SS, CD
It is the objective of this course to introduce and critically review the nature of relationships between racial and ethnic groups in society. We approach this first by critically examining the concepts, perspectives, and research traditionally identified with majority and minority group relations in sociology. Secondly, we explore the nature of intergroup attitudes and discrimination as important dimensions in the creation and perpetuation of majority-minority relations in society. Thirdly, we examine these conceptual approaches and patterns of discrimination in the context of immigration and the historical and institutional experiences of selected racial and ethnic groups in the United States. Finally, we will explore race and ethnic relations in the global context. Enrollment Limit: 30.
Sem 2 SOCI-277-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Mr. White
282. Classical and Contemporary Sociological Theory 4 hours
4SS, CD, WR
Classical sociology arose in response to the dramatic social transformation of European societies in the wake of the Industrial and French revolutions. Its central focus were the numerous social and political problems opened up by the advent of modern industrial society from the disintegration of community and the decline of the sacred to the emergence of new forms of exploitation and class conflict, and the pervasive rationalization and routinization of social life. The founding fathers of modern sociology--Durkheim, Marx, and Weber--formulated their theories in response to such problems, establishing, in the process, three distinct traditions in sociological theory and research. This course explores the continuities between classical and contemporary sociological theory and research within each one of these three traditions: Durkheimian, Marxist, Weberian. Throughout the course, a consistent effort is made to evaluate sociological theories from the point of view of their empirical validity and explanatory power, as well as their "background assumptions" (values and methodological presuppositions). Enrollment Limit: 40. Priority given to sociology majors.
Sem 2 SOCI-282-01 MWF 10:00-10:50 Mr. Vujacic

  

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Advanced Courses in Specializations

320. When A Person Speaks Sincere: Critical Ethnography and
Urban Transformations in the U.S.
3 hours
3SS
Sociology is characterized by two principal means of data collection: quantitative and qualitative. This course familiarizes students with the latter methodology by reviewing debates over how to ethically and effectively conduct ethnographic research. Exercises in observation, interviewing, interpretation and analysis are integral to the class as students are sensitized to varieties and regularities of everyday life. Students conduct a limited ethnography revealing how such interactions reinforce or transform social hierarchies in rapidly changing urban settings. Prerequisites: Introductory sociology course and one advanced course in sociology. SOCI 211 strongly recommended. Enrollment Limit: 20.
Sem 2 SOCI-320-01 TuTh 3:00-4:15 Ms. Charfauros McDaniel
326. The American Family: Comfort, Conflict, and Criticism 3 hours
3SS, CD
This course focuses on the diversity of families in the United States. Families included in discussion are: gay and lesbian, African American, Mexican American, Asian American, Native American, White, single parents, cohabitors, and married couples. The work-family nexus is investigated in order to understand how these institutions are reciprocally related. Both economic and cultural explanations of diversity are explored. Finally, we address the conflict that surrounds many family forms. Prerequisites: One course in sociology or permission of the instructor. Enrollment Limit: 25.
Sem 2 SOCI-326-01 MWF 11:00-11:50 Ms. John
330. Global Feminisms 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR
This interdisciplinary course examines feminisms worldwide. The course is organized to address feminisms as individual processes, collective practices, and organized movements. It will also address the impact of local, national, and international structures on feminisms, and the ways in which international economic and political inequalities have complicated gender debates. This course meets the feminist theory recommendation for majors. Not open to first years. Priority to Women's Studies and Sociology majors. Identitcal to WOST 330. Enrollment Limit: 20.
Sem 2 SOCI-207 MWF 9:00-9:50 Ms. Hasso
331. Torts, Trials and Trouble 3 hours
3SS, WR
Next offered 2002-2003.
354. Social Movements and Revolutionary Change 3 hours
3SS
Next offered 2002-2003.
377. Advanced Topics in Race and Ethnic Relations 3 hours
3SS
Next offered 2002-2003.
378. Sociology of the African-American Community 3 hours
3SS, CD
Next offered 2002-2003.
381. The Rise of the Networked Society: Technology's Impact on Social Life 3 hours
3SS
Next offered 2002-2003.
391. Practicum in Sociology 2-3 hours
2-3SS
This course combines individual internships and private readings on a subject matter related to the internship -- for example, an internship in a social service agency and readings and discussion on poverty and welfare issues. See individual faculty. Sections will be offered by Ms. John, Mr. Norris, Mr. Walsh, Mr. White, Ms. Charfauros McDaniel and Mr. Vujacic. Prerequisites: Two courses in sociology. Consent of instructor required.
392. Internships in Teaching 1-2 hours
1-2SS
Sections will be offered by Ms. John, Mr. Norris, Mr. Walsh, Mr. White, Ms. Charfauros McDaniel and Mr. Vujacic. Consent of instructor required.

  

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Senior Seminars

These seminars are designed to integrate theory, methods, and the core analytical areas by linking the specific seminar topic to broader sociological issues. They serve as capstones for the sociology major.
403. Seminar in Social Psychology: African-American Personality 3 hours
3SS, CD
Next offered 2002-2003.
406. Seminar: Gender and the State in the Middle East 4 hours
4SS, CD, WRi
This seminar will study the gender implications of the relationship between states and religious authorities in a few Arab states in the late 20th century. While "civil" laws (addressing work, education, and politics) are often gender egalitarian, "religious" laws (addressing marriage and family) are usually not. Important for the purposes of this seminar is why this relationship varies in different states. Students are required to write a research paper based on a cse study. Consent of instructor required. Priority to Women's Studies and Sociology majors. Identical to WOST 405. Enrollment Limit: 15.
Sem 2 SOCI-406-01 W 2:30-4:20 Ms. Hasso
431. Seminar: The Making and Unmaking of Communist Ideals 3 hours
3SS
(Learning About Society Through Historiography, Literature, and Film) In this seminar we will explore the development of communism in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe through historiography, literature, and film. First, we will look at the Leninist application of Marxism in the Russian historical context. Next, we will explore the background and course of the two Russian revolutions of 1917 through the eyes of one of its main architects and Marxist historians­Leon Trotsky. The main part of the course is devoted to early revolutionary dilemmas, the relationship of intellectuals to the revolution both in Soviet Russia and the West, and the rise of Stalinism. Finally, we will document the process of the gradual disillusionment with Communism in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. Major authors will include Trotsky and Tucker (historiography), Gladkov, Silone, Koestler, Solzhenitsyn, and Milosz (literature), with films by Beatty, Eisenstein, Bertolucci, Mikhalkov, Abuladze, and Makavejev. Prerequisites: Two sociology courses or consent from instructor. Enrollment Limit: 12.
Sem 2 SOCI-431-01 Tu 1:00-2:50 Mr. Vujacic
436. Seminar in Sexualities and Collective Action 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR
Next offered 2002-2003.
443. Generations of Youth: Relationship, Work, Culture, and Communication 3 hours
3SS
This seminar will focus on several birth cohorts in the U.S. We will examine issues concerning relationships and sexuality, employment, underemployment and unemployment, cultural contributions, communication and social concerns of youth. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how youth experience differs from others and what implications this has for quality of life and social policy. Texts, video, music and the World Wide Web will be used as supplemental materials in this class. Prerequisites: Three courses in Sociology or consent of instructor. Enrollment Limit: 12.
Sem 2 SOCI-443-01 W 2:30-4:20 Ms. John
446. Seminar on the City, Environmental and Social Policy 3 hours
3SS, WR
We will study the global and the local, particularly the city, and recent developments which bring together urban environmental and social policy. Thus, we will consider various approaches to urban sprawl, to the degradation of urban environments, and to the difficulties faced by many urban residents (poverty, homelessness, transportation, housing). We will use a comparative national and international approach, searching out the cities which seem to be working, e.g. Chattanooga, Portland, Curitiba, (and not working). Prerequisites: SOCI 241 and two courses in Sociology or consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.
Sem 1 SOCI-446-01 W 2:30-4:20 Mr. Norris
447. Seminar: Asian Pacific American Women 3 hours
3SS, CD
This course explores the intersection of ethnicity, race, class, gender, and sexuality in the lives of Asian Pacific American women. We will analyze the historical and contemporary social, political, and economic forces that shape their life experiences in the U.S. Our focus is understanding both the diversity and commonalty of the social histories of women from the various Asian subgroups. We will bring in the voices of these women by doing an oral history research project. Prerequisites: SOCI 215 and/or SOCI 260 or consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.
Sem 1 SOCI-447-01 F 1:00-3:00 Ms. Charfauros McDaniel
472. Society of Law Seminar, a.k.a. Breakfast and the Law 3 hours
3SS
The law never sleeps. This seminar will have a substantial field work emphasis in the first half semester with time spent in courts, prisons, police stations, law firms and Appellate Courts. That begins early and so will we--over breakfast. Students will present seminar papers in the latter half of the semester on topics negotiated with the instructor. Enrollment Limit: 10.
Sem 2 SOCI-472-01 W 8:00-9:50 a.m. Mr. Walsh
Honors and Private Reading Courses
490. Junior Year Honors 1-3 hours
1-3SS
Sections will be offered by Ms. John, Mr. Norris, Mr. Walsh, Mr. White, Ms. Charfauros McDaniel and Mr. Vujacic. Consent of instructor required.
491. Senior Year Honors 2-6 hours
2-6SS
Sections will be offered by Ms. John, Mr. Norris, Mr. Walsh, Mr. White, Ms. Charfauros McDaniel and Mr. Vujacic. Consent of instructor required.
995. Private Reading 1-3 hours
1-3SS
Consent of instructor required. Projects will be sponsored by Ms. John, Ms. Charfauros McDaniel, Mr. Vujacic, Mr. White, Mr. Walsh, Mr. Norris and Mr. Stackman.

 

 

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