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Religion

The Religion major is designed to serve as a focus of a liberal arts education for the general student and as a pre-professional foundation for those pursuing the study of religion beyond the baccalaureate degree. Some courses in the Religion Department are cross-referenced or cross-listed with other programs of study in the College -- e.g., African American Studies, East Asian Studies, Jewish Studies, and Women's Studies. While offering a broad focus in the humanities and in the study of religion, the major also affords an opportunity for concentrated study in particular religious traditions and specific areas of religious thought and practice. Students who contemplate graduate study in Religion or professional study in seminary or Rabbinical school after graduation are advised to consult as early in their undergraduate careers as possible with the Chair or other members of the Department.
Entry-Level Courses and Sequence Suggestions. The Department of Religion offers nine introductory courses dealing with traditions and topics in the scholarly study of religion. These courses--101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, and 109--have the same purpose but draw on different traditions and topics. These courses may best meet the needs of students who seek only
one course in Religion, or they may serve as a first course for students who plan further study in the Department. They are not, however, prerequisites for course work at the 200 level. The Department also offers several "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students" as indicated in the course listing. Seminars (taught at the 300 level) require the consent of the instructor, and students taking them will ordinarily have done previous 200-level course work in subject matter relevant to the topic of the seminar.
Major. The major consists of 27 hours in the Department. Under ordinary circumstances no more than one of the nine "Introduction to Religion" (RELG 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109) courses may be counted in the 27 hours required for the major. Students majoring in Religion must complete the following:
(a) Take one designated "core" course at the 200 level in at least four of the nine areas in which course work is offered. The nine areas, and courses that fall within each area, are listed below. The "core" courses are those marked with an asterisk.
American Religious History: 282*, 284*, 285
Christian History: 213, 216, 217*, 218*
East Asian Religions: 235*, 236*, 238*
Ethics: 245*, 246*, 247, 248*, 249
Islam: 270*, 272*, 274
Jewish and Christian Scriptures: 205*, 206*, 208*, 209
Judaism: 250*, 251*, 255, 258
Modern Religious Thought: 225*, 226*, 227*, 228, 261, 262
South Asian Religions: 231*, 232, 233*
(b) Take at least one additional course at the 200 level in one of the four areas in which they have taken a "core" course, thus forming a small concentration. The second 200 level course need not be a "core" course.
(c) Take one seminar at the 300 level. Majors are encouraged to take the seminar within the area of their concentration.
The following course may be counted toward the Religion major: ENGL 213, The Bible and Literature in English.
Minor. Majors in other departments or programs may minor in Religion by taking at least five courses totaling 15 hours. One of these courses must be a seminar.
Honors. The honors program in Religion offers qualified students the opportunity to work closely with a faculty member while pursuing an independent project of research and writing. Honors work is done in the student's senior year and culminates in a written thesis of not less than 50 or more than 100 pages--and in an oral defense of the thesis. Credit hours earned from the honors project should be over and above the basic 27 hours required for the major. On or about March 15, qualified junior majors are invited by the Department to apply, or may themselves apply, for honors work. Applicants must submit to the Department a prospectus for the proposed research project by April 15. Guidelines for this prospectus are found at the end of each semester's departmental supplement. More detailed information about the nature of this prospectus can be obtained from the Department Chair or any member of the Department.
Transfer of Credit. Students wishing to transfer credit toward the Religion major are advised to provide the Department with as much information about the transferred course as possible (e.g., syllabus, papers, exams). The Department will not normally count more than six hours of transfer credit toward the major and does not normally accept transferred courses to satisfy distribution requirements in the major.
Winter Term. Faculty in the Religion Department sponsor a wide variety of Winter Term projects, particularly projects related to their areas of scholarly expertise. Students planning projects are invited to approach individual faculty members to discuss their ideas and plans.

 

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Introductory Courses

101. Introduction to Religion: Religion as a World Phenomenon 3 hours
3HU, CD
Next offered 2002-2003.
102. Introduction to Religion: Roots of the Western Traditions 3 hours
3HU, CD
This course will explore religious narratives and symbolic representations in major Western religious traditions. Myths, rituals and historical narratives that express the fundamental outlook of individuals and cultures will be studied. We will consider how cultures "construct" a view of "reality" and the way in which these "constructions" are taken to be absolutely true and real. Three traditions will be considered. Enrollment Limit: 35.
Sem 2 RELG-102-01 To be arranged Staff
103. Introduction to Religion: Material Religion 3 hours
3HU, CD, WR
Course introduces religious systems of Asian Buddhism, American Christianity, and Oceania through study of the circulation, veneration, and manufacture of material culture such as relics, beads, icons, and amulets. Accumulation, theorization, and disappearance of religious objects reveal how origins of traditions are imagined through these materials, how they form a basis for religious reflection and practice, and how substance and symbolism, ritual and exchange, and politics of production affect an aura and an experience of sacrality. Enrollment Limit: 30.
Sem 1 RELG-103-01 MWF 3:30-4:20 Ms. Gade
104. Introduction to Religion: Religion, Power, and Identity 3 hours
3HU, CD, WR
An introduction to the vocabulary, methods, and assumptions of the academic study of religion. Through an examination of diverse religious communities, including Lakota Sioux, Nation of Islam, and Southern Pentecostal, we will analyze patterns that scholars commonly find across religions. Particular attention will be given to the role of religion within social justice and salvation movements, and in the formation of individual and group identities. Enrollment Limit: 35.
Sem 1 RELG-101-01 TuTh 1:30-2:45 Mr. Stockdale
105. Introduction to Religion: African Religions and their Thought Systems 3 hours
3HU, CD
An introduction to the philosophical basis of African society through a study of various African Religions: Traditional Religions; and Islam and Christianity, especially in their indigenized forms. This study will also examine the underlying nature of African religious thought, the function of myth and ritual, and the complex and profoundly sophisticated African concepts of the spiritual universe. Consideration will be given to the relationship between religion and culture in various societies. Questions will be raised regarding the different ways religion is conceived in various cultures; African and "non-African," Western and "non-Western." Enrollment Limit: 35.
Sem 1 RELG-105-01 TuTh 11:00-12:15 Mr. Miller
106. Introduction to Religion: The Development of Western Traditions 3 hours
3HU, CD
Next offered 2002-2003.
107. Introduction to Religion: Cosmogony and Ethics 3 hours
3HU, CD
This course will examine a variety of ways in which people have attempted to find meaning by connecting their actions to their understanding of the creation of the world/universe. The course will proceed by examining first religion as a phenomenon itself, and then religious traditions and creation stories from Indian mythology, Greek mythology, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and a modern scientific/sociological perspective for their religious/ethical significance. Enrollment Limit: 35.
Sem 2 RELG-107-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Ms. McClure
108. Introduction to Religion: Women and the Western Traditions 3 hours
3 HU, CD
An introduction to Judaism, Christianity and Islam that focuses on women's experiences and gender roles. This course will examine representations of women in sacred texts; primary sources by and about women from various historical periods (the Beruriah Traditions, "The Acts of Paul and Thecla," The Life of Saint Teresa of Avila, the sayings of Rabiah of Basra); and contemporary feminist voices within each religious tradition. Enrollment Limit: 40.
Sem 1 RELG-108-01 TuTh 3:00-4:15 Ms. Kamitsuka
109. Introduction to Religion: Magic and Religion in the 3 hours
Ancient Mediterranean
3 HU, CD
Two central questions structure this introductory course to the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (Judaism, Christianity and Greek and Roman polytheism): how, if at all, did ancient Mediterraneans articulate the difference between religion and magic and how have modern Western scholars attempted to conceptualize this difference? Students will analyze a variety of ancient sources including texts, inscriptions, and archaeological artifacts as well as assess modern scholarly works on these issues. Enrollment Limit:35.
Sem 2 RELG-109-01 TuTh 9:35-10:50 Ms. Gibson

 

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Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students

115. Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. 3 hours
3HU, CD, WR
Next offered 2002-2003.
117. The Sacred and the Other 3 hours
3 HU, CD, WRi
For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First and Second Year Students" Enrollment Limit: 15.
Sem 1. RELG-117-01 TuTh 9:35-10:50 Mr. Kamitsuka
118. Immanence and Transcendence in Buddhism 3 hours
3HU, CD, WRi
Next offered 2002-2003.
151. The Religious Thought of Mohandas Gandhi 3 hours
3HU, CD, WRi
Next offered 2003-2004.

 

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Intermediate Courses

205. Hebrew Bible in its Ancient Near Eastern Context 3 hours
3HU, CD
Next offered 2003-2004.
206. Ancient Judaism from the Exile to the Rise of the Rabbis 3 hours
3HU, CD
Next offered 2002-2003.
208. The New Testament and Christian Origins 3 hours
3HU, WR
This course examines the New Testament in its Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts. Text and literary criticism as well as the historical-critical method are applied to the literature and theologies of the earliest Christian communities in order to illumine Christianity's origins and development. Important themes include orthodoxy and heresy, the division between Jews and Gentiles, the many images of Jesus and the emergence of the New Testament anthology as canon. Enrollment Limit: 40.
Sem 2 RELG 208-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Ms. Gibson
209. Women in Ancient Mediterranean Religions 3 hours
3HU, CD
Next offered 2002-2003.
216. Christian Utopias and Communitarian Movements 3 hours
3HU
Next offered 2002-2003.
217. Christian Thought and Action: Early and Medieval 3 hours
3HU
An interpretive study of the Christian tradition from the time of the early Church through the fourteenth century. Theological issues and the relationship of Christianity to society are considered along with such subjects as symbolism and the arts, saints, monasticism, mysticism, worship, popular religious devotion, and the roles of reform, dissent, and heresy. Enrollment Limit: 40.
Sem 1 RELG-217-01 To be arranged Staff
218. Christian Thought and Action: Reformation and Modern 3 hours
3HU
An interpretive study of the Christian tradition from the 14th to the 20th century, with emphasis on the formative ideas of the 16th century reformers, Protestant and Catholic, and the development of these ideas as Christianity faced far-reaching changes in society and the world of thought. Distinctive theologies, responses to the Englightenment and the industrial revolution, social action pietism, modern Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, and the emergence of liberal and evangelical forms of the Christianity are among subjects considered. Enrollment Limit: 40.
Sem 2 RELG-218-01 To be arranged Staff
225. Modern Religious Thought in the West: 3 hours
Late 17th to early 19th Century
3HU
An analysis of Western philosophy of religion and theology as developed in Europe and North America from the end of the Thirty Years War to the early 19th century. Of special interest will be how the emerging scientific worldview affected traditional religious beliefs including views of God, human nature, the authority of scripture, the legitimacy of religious institutions, and the true "essence" of religion. Some of the thinkers to be studied include Pascal, Locke, Hume, Voltaire, Rousseau, Kant, Mendelssohn, Schleiermacher and Feuerbach. Enrollment Limit: 40.
Sem 1 RELG-225-01 MWF 11:00-11:50 Mr. Kamitsuka
226. Modern Religious Thought in the West: 19th to mid-20th Century 3 hours
3HU
An analysis of developments in Western philosophy of religion and theology from the nineteenth century to the mid-twentieth century. Central topics to be examined include theological responses to modern scientific and historical consciousness, secular critiques of religion, debates on the human condition, and efforts to address cultural and religious issues arising from the devastation of the two world wars. Some of the thinkers to be studied include Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Buber, Tillich, R. Niebuhr, A. Cohen and J. Plaskow. Enrollment Limit: 40.
Sem 2 RELG-226-01 MWF 11:00-11:50 Mr. Kamitsuka
227. Contemporary Religious Thought in the West 3 hours
3HU
Next offered 2002-2003.
228. Recent Developments in Christian Theology 3 hours
3HU, CD
Next offered 2003-2004.
231. Origins and Development of Hinduism 3 hours
3HU, CD
A study of the Hindu tradition in India, from its origins to the development of the later devotional movements. Textual study focuses on ritual hymns, renunciatory texts, devotional poems, and classical mythology. Attention is also paid to analysis of religious practices, especially as they vary according to social location and gender of adherents. Societal aspects of Hinduism to be explored include religious constructions of "caste," notions of religious kingship, and gendered perceptions of the divine. Enrollment Limit: 40.
Sem 1 RELG-231-01 MWF 11:00-11:50 Ms. Richman
232. Religious Epics of India 3 hours
3HU, CD, WR
Next offered 2004-2005.
233. Religion in Modern India 3 hours
3HU, CD
A study of the effect of colonial rule and social change on Indian religious traditions. We examine theological tracts and debates, mythological and ritual texts, oral traditions, and contemporary novels about religion. Topics include social mobility and orthodoxy, religious roots of the Gandhian movement for independence, changing rituals within the joint family, religion in the present-day political sphere, and Hinduism in the West. Enrollment Limit: 45.
Sem 2 RELG-233-01 TuTh 1:30-2:45 Ms. Richman
235. Chinese Thought and Religion 3 hours
3HU, CD
An historical survey of the three major religious and philosophical traditions of China: Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism. Attention is given to how each comprehends the universe, and translates its ideal into philosophical thought, religious practice, and social and moral imperative. Interaction and mutual borrowing among the three will be examined to show how each was changed or inspired by the others and matured under their influence. Identical to EAST 151. Enrollment Limit: 40.
Sem 2 RELG-235-01 To be arranged Staff
236. Japanese Thought and Religion 3 hours
3HU, CD
A survey of the role of religion--primarily Shinto and Buddhism--in Japanese history and culture. We will examine elite as well as popular forms of religion, doctrinal issues as well as issues of religion in practice, and the role of aesthetics in Japanese religion. Materials to be used include primary sources in translation, descriptive studies, and an occasional film. Identical to EAST 152. Enrollment Limit: 40.
Sem 1 RELG-236-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Mr. Stockdale
245. Modern Moral Issues in Religious Perspective 3 hours
3HU
An examination of selected moral issues from the perspective of Christian and Jewish traditions, as well as secular positions. Topics will include such issues as lying, euthanasia, abortion, human sexuality, war and peace, and the death penalty. This course also offers an introduction to systematic ethical reasoning. Enrollment Limit: 40.
Sem 2 RELG-245-01 MWF 9:00-9:50 Ms. McClure
247. Feminist Ethical Issues 3 hours
3HU, CD, Wri
Next offered 2002-2003.
248. Approaches to Religious Ethics 3 hours
3HU
Next offered 2002-2003.
249. Issues in Medical Ethics 3 hours
3HU
Next offered 2002-2003.
250. Medieval Jewish Thought and Culture 3 hours
3HU, CD, WR
Identical to JWST 150. For full course description, see Jewish Studies Program course listings. Enrollment Limit: 45
Sem 1 RELG-250-01 MWF 10:00-10:50 Mr. Socher
251. Judaism in the Modern Period: Tradition and Crisis 3 hours
3HU, CD, WR
Identical to JWST 151. For full course description, see Jewish Studies Program course listings. Enrollment Limit: 45.
Sem 2 RELG-251-01 MWF 10:00-10:50 Mr. Socher
258. Introduction to the Talmud: Argument and Interpretation 3 hours
3HU, CD, WR
Identical to JWST 258. For full course description, see Jewish Studies Program course listings. Enrollment Limit: 25.
Sem 1 RELG-258-01 MW 12:00-1:15 Mr. Socher
262. Feminist Religious Thought in Multicultural Perspective 3 hours
3HU, CD
This course will examine critical and constructive women's religious thought from multiple perspectives ("third world," academic, grassroots, lesbian, Latina, etc.) and within multiple religious traditions (Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Buddhist). Students will study a range of theories (standpoint theory, feminist poststructuralism, queer theory, etc.) in order to analyze critically the intersections of oppressions such as sexism, racism, heterosexism, and colonialism in women's religious experiences. Enrollment Limit: 35.
Sem 2 RELG-262-01 TTh 3:00-4:15 Ms. Kamitsuka
270. Islam 3 hours
3HU, CD
Survey of the religious tradition of Islam. Lectures and readings present a global perspective, covering sources of tradition such as the Qur'an and the experience of the early Muslim community, theology, and law; and, further development of Islamic thought and practice in Muslim communities such as patterns of Islamic polities and the impact of Sufism in an expanding Muslim world. Topics include movements of resurgence and reform, and other key aspects of modern Muslim experience. Enrollment Limit: 40.
Sem 1 RELG 270-01 MWF 10:00-10:50 Ms. Gade
272. Introduction to the Qur'an 3 hours
3HU, CD
Introduction to the Qur'an, the sacred scripture of the Islamic religious tradition. Topics include approaches to the idea of revelation and the history of the written text, its overall content and themes, development of Qur'anic Sciences such as grammar and interpretation, the style and poetics of the Qur'an, and the Qur'an as a source of law, theology, aesthetics, and practices of piety such as recitation. Emphasis on reading the Qur'an in English-language interpretation. Enrollment Limit: 40.
Sem 2 RELG 272-01 MWF 3:30-4:20 Ms. Gade
274. Sufism 3 hours
3HU, CD
Next offered 2002-2003.
276. Understanding Music and Ritual 3 hours
3HU, CD
This course investigates intersections of religious and musical practice. The study of ritual and ethnomusicological frameworks provide methods to explore diverse cross-cultural case studies. Emphasis is on vocal performances, drawing on traditions of religious chant as well as practices such as laments, trance and healing. Topics include understandings of embodiment in musical theory and practice, roles of specialists, and historical change, including the impact of modern technologies. Enrollment Limit: 25.
Sem 2 RELG 276-01 MW 12:00-1:15 Ms. Gade
282. Survey of American Christianity 3 hours
3HU
Introduction to major issues, figures and movements in American religious history and American Christianity. Attention will be given to persistent themes such as individualism, the search for community, religion and reform, religious conservatism and innovation, and the religious nature of American culture. Class, race, ethnicity and gender will also be addressed as we explore American religious experience in all its diversity. The goal is to better understand the place of religion in American society, and to evaluate its past impact and future role. Enrollment Limit: 35.
Sem 2 RELG-282-01 TuTh 9:35-10:50 Mr. Miller
284. The History of the African-American Religious Experience 3 hours
3HU, CD
An introduction to the religious movements and institutions of African-Americans from the period of slavery to the present. Various topics including: African religions; slave religion; independent black Protestant churches; gender and race relations in American church life; politics in black churches; missionary efforts to Africa and the Caribbean; Islam, Judaism, Catholicism, Pentecostalism; the civil rights movement; modern role of religion in African American life. Enrollment Limit: 45.
Sem 1 RELG-284-01 TuTh 3:00-4:15 Mr. Miller
285. Evangelicalism in the United States 3 hours
3 HU
This course will explore the historical development of this movement from its nineteenth century beginnings to the present, including: its relationship to 19th century moral controversies such as slavery, abolition, women's rights and temperance movements; its responses to the social gospel movement; the conflict between fundamentalism and modernism; its growth and institutional diversification as a post-WWII movement; the modern tension between evangelism and social action; and the continuing issues of race, class, and gender. Various denominational and theological orientations will be explored, including: Reformed, Arminian, Anabaptist, Catholic, Pentecostal, and Holiness. Other disciplines such as sociology of religion, psychology, and anthropology will also be drawn upon to broaden our understanding of this movement as a social phenomenon. Enrollment Limit: 35.
Sem 2 RELG 285-01 TuTh 3:00-4:15 Mr. Miller
299. Approaches to the Study of Religion 3 hours
3HU
Next offered 2003-2003.

 

 

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Seminars

319. Seminar: Taoism 3 hours
3HU, CD
Next offered 2003-2004.
322. Selected Issues in Buddhism 3 hours
3HU, CD, WR
Topic for 2001-2002: Interpreting Japanese Religion: Critical Issues and Problems. This course will investigate interpretive issues that arise when examining religious beliefs and practice. We will focus on several areas of Japanese religion that have proven difficult or contentious for scholars to explain, including abortion memorial practices, the character of Zen Buddhism, and contemporary cults. In each case, we will enlist theories of religion to help us ask how and why scholars see the same religious materials in radically different ways. Prerequisites: RELG 236 or HIST 160 and consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 15
Sem 1 RELG-322-01 W 7:00-8:50 Mr. Stockdale
329. Seminar: Research Methods 3 hours
3HU, Wri
Next offered 2003-2004.
336. Seminar: Selected Topics in Early Christianity 3 hours
3HU, WR
Next offered 2004-2005.
338. Seminar: Selected Topics in Early Judaism and Christianity 3 hours
3HU, WR
Topic for 2001-02: The History of Persecution and the Literature of Martyrdom. This course will investigate martyrdom of Jews and Christians in Greco-Roman world. The course will trace martyrdom beginning with the Maccabees (2nd C BCE) through the Great Persecution of Christians in the 4th C CE. Special attention will be paid to the continuity between Jewish and Christian martyrdom, Greek and Roman explanations for persecutions, and the literary tradition that commemorates martyrs. Consent of the instructor and either RELG 206 or RELG 208 are required. Enrollment Limit:15.
Sem 2 RELG-338-01 Th 7:00-9:00 p.m. Ms. Gibson
339. Seminar: Religion, War, and Peace 3 hours
3HU, CD, Wri
The main focus of the course is an examination of positions on war and peace taken by three religious traditions, Christianity, Islam, and Judaism, as well as secular just war and pacifist theories. The course also includes an ethical assessment of war and nuclear deterrence, and concludes with an analysis of the religious and secular arguments used during the Gulf War. Viewing of course films is required. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit:15.
Sem 2 RELG-339-01 Th 1:00-2:50 Ms. McClure
340. Seminar: Ethical Issues in Death and Dying 3 hours
3HU, WRi
Next offered 2003-2004.
341. Seminar: Issues in Religious Ethics 3 hours
3HU, WR
Next offered 2002-2003.
342. Seminar: Selected Thinkers in Modern and 3 hours
Contemporary Religious Thought
3HU, WR
Next offered 2002-2003.
343. Seminar: Selected Topics in Modern and Contemporary 3 hours
Religious Thought
3HU, WR
Topic for 2000-2001: Religious Existentialism. This seminar examines some of the classic figures in 20th-century religious existentialism within the Christian and Jewish traditions such as Rahner, Buber, Marcel, Tillich, Levinas. These thinkers will be studied in the context of religious existentialism's forefunners (Augustine, Pascal, Kierkegaard) and its contemporaneous secular philosophical influences (Sartre, Camus, Heidegger). Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 15.
Sem 2 RELG-343-01 Th 7:00-9:00 p.m. Mr. Kamitsuka
353. Seminar: Moses Maimonides: Philosophy & Law 3 hours
3HU, CD, WRi
Identical to JWST 353. For full course description, see Jewish Studies Program course listings. Enrollment Limit: 15.
Sem 2 JWST-353-01 W 2:30-4:20 Mr. Socher
365. Seminar: Selected Topics in Women and Religion 3 hours
3HU, CD, WR
Topic for 2000-2001: Women, Religion, and the Body. This seminar investigates representations and regulations of women's bodies in religious texts and ritual practices, using current feminist theoretical tools and feminist ethnographic research in the study of religion. Topics to be studied will include: asceticism, veiling, menstruation and ritual impurity, ecstatic mystical experience, death and the afterlife. Consent of the instructor and at least one previous course in religion required. Enrollment Limit: 15.
Sem 2 RELG 365-01 W 2:30-4:20 Ms. Kamitsuka
371. Seminar: Islam and Modern Social Change 3 hours
3 HU, CD, WRi
Consideration of roots of modern Muslim movements of revival, renewal and reform, emphasizing the diversity of modes by which Islam is viewed as a vehicle for religious and social change. Emphasis on sociological and anthropological perspectives about Muslim societies and contexts in which Muslims represent a religious minority. Topics include "orientalism," understandings of liberation and resistance, nationhood, law, gender, education, contested and revitalized practices, and projects of piety under conditions of a worldwide "Islamic awakening." Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 15.
Sem 1 RELG 371-01 Th 7:00-9:00 p.m. Ms. Gade
372. Seminar: Southeast Asian Religious Systems 3 hours
3HU, CD
Next offered 2003-2004.
384. Seminar: Selected Topics in African American Religious History: 3 hours
The Black Theology Movement
3HU, WR
An intensive study of the Black Theology movement as a theology of liberation. Topics include: antecedents in 19th century African American Christianity; 20th century stimuli which initiated the modern movement; responses from the white theological community; critiques from within the black theological and church community; assessments from Black Christian Nationalism and the Nation of Islam; issues of gender and class; Latin American and African liberation theology movements; and its past and present relationship with the attempts to challenge the modern black church towards social action. Prerequisites: RELG 284 - The History of the African-American Religious Experience or an equivalent course in African American history. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 15.
Sem 1 RELG-384-01 W 2:30-4:20 Mr. Miller
385. Seminar: Selected Topics in American Religious History 3 hours
3SS, WR
Next offered 2001-2002.
401. Senior Honors 2-5 hours
2-5HU, WR
Consent of instructor required. Projects could be sponsored by Ms. Gade, Ms. Gibson, Mr. Kamitsuka, Ms. McClure, Ms. McMillin, Mr. Miller, Ms. Richman, Mr. Socher, and Mr. Zinn.
995. Private Reading 1-3 hours
1-3HU
Consent of instructor required. Projects could be sponsored by Ms. Gade, Ms. Gibson, Mr. Kamitsuka, Ms. McClure, Ms. McMillin, Mr. Miller, Ms. Richman, Mr. Socher, and Mr. Zinn.

 

 

 

London Program

900. The Danenberg Lectures on British Culture and Society 2 hours
2 EX
For full course description see section entitled "London Program."
Sem 1 LOND-900-01 To be arranged Mr. Longsworth, Mr. Zinn
955. Studies in Religion and Literature in English History and Culture 6 hours
6 HU
Religious convictions--often deeply embedded and sometimes quite disruptive--have been powerful forces in English history. And those convictions have been richly productive of literature. In this course, several selected topics (including the Anglo-Saxon tension between Germanic and Christian values, interpretations of the Bible, English music, popular piety, university traditions, and the competing conventions of romantic and spiritual love) will enable students to explore some linkages between religion, literature, and history, through the careful analysis of texts, artifacts, and places in which they are revealed. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 26.
Sem 1 ENGL-955-01 To be arranged Mr. Longsworth

RELG-955-01 Mr. Zinn

956. Sacred Places, Spaces, and Actions: 3 hours
Religious Life in London and Southern England
From the Middle Ages to the Twentieth Century
3HU
With numerous religious sites and structures, London and Southern England offer an excellent setting for examining forms of religious life and rituals from the middle ages through the modern period. With major Christian cathedrals, churches, pilgrimage sites, and monasteries, as well as modern synagogues and mosques, at hand, all with their differing rituals, students will pursue group and individual projects focused on specific religious sites and/or rituals. The class will also consider manuscripts and other religious objects in major London libraries and museums. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 26.
Sem 1 RELG-956-01 To be arranged Mr. Zinn
NOTE: For the first semester, students on the Program will also take Mr. Longsworth's course ENGL 957, "London in Literature." For full course description see section entitled "London Program."

 

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