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London Program

The program was instituted as a memorial to the late Emil Danenberg, eleventh president of Oberlin and a great friend to international education. Through the Danenberg Oberlin-in-London Program, up to 26 students each semester study in London for Oberlin credit. Two Oberlin faculty members, each from a different discipline, direct the program in the fall and spring.

Faculty for the fall semester program will be:

Sonia Kruks, Danforth Professor of Politics

Jeffrey Pence, Assistant Professor of English

Faculty for the spring semester will be:

Stephan Mayer, Associate Professor of Psychology

David Orr, Professor of Environmental Studies

Admission to the program is by application only. Applications are due in March for the fall semester and in October for the spring semester. Students are notified by mail each semester when the applications are available. Applications are reviewed by the faculty directors of the program and by the chair of the London Program Committee.

The program is open to any Oberlin student who will be at least a second-semester sophomore at the time of the program. Special conditions of academic preparedness may apply for the individual semesters and courses. The faculty and committee will be especially interested in students who show a serious interest in taking advantage of the resources of the program. The faculty and committee hope for applications from a wide range of Oberlin students and are prepared to recognize a number of different cases for admission. Limited funds are available to sponsor two credits' worth of music study for a small number of Conservatory performance or composition majors each semester. Applications for those funds can be picked up in King 105 and should be turned in with the standard application for admission to the program.

The program maintains classrooms, an office, a lounge, and study space in London. Administrative Director Gwyneth Love lives in London and has general responsibility for the on-site coordination of the program. Students live in small groups away from the study center, usually in small semi-independent apartments ("flats") with limited kitchen facilities and study space. The program cost is equivalent to that of a semester at Oberlin, plus transatlantic airfare (approximately $250 of which will be credited on the term bill). Financial aid is available to the same degree as for a semester in residence. Students are given a weekly allowance in cash to cover costs of buying food, minimal household necessities, and passes for tube and bus travel within London. As at Oberlin, students will need some extra pocket money for textbooks, personal costs, entertainment, and traveling.

Each student's academic program will normally include 14 credit hours: an interdisciplinary, team-taught course; one departmental course; and a two-credit course on British history and culture. In all cases, course work will have a strong experiential component, involving the student in the cultural, natural, and institutional life of London and Great Britain.

Further information about the program may be found on the web at www.oberlin.edu/~london.

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Fall Semester Courses

900. The Danenberg Lectures on British Culture and Society 2 hours
2EX
An introduction to the history and culture of Britain, examining the roots of contemporary London and Britain by exploring selected topics in social, political, and cultural history from antiquity to the modern era. The course will be coordinated by both instructors, but taught by a series of visiting experts (who will speak and lead discussions in their fields) and supplemented by field trips to museums and pertinent historical sites. This course is for all students. Notes: CR/NE grading. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 26.

Sem 1 LOND-900-01 To be arranged Ms. Kruks and Mr. Pence

924. Culture and Politics in Post-War Britain 6 hours
3HU, 3SS
This interdisciplinary course will explore different intersections of culture and politics in post-war Britain (1945 to the present). A focus will be on the evolution of social class: as a set of institutions, as expressed in cultural and art forms, and as debated in critical social and cultural theory. Students will explore high and popular culture, museums and monuments, and the city itself, to learn to read the articulations of class relations in the fabric of everyday life. Consent of instructors required. Enrollment Limit: 26.

Sem 1 ENGL-924-01 To be arranged Mr. Pence
POLT-924-01 To be arranged Ms. Kruks

925. British Theater 6 hours
6HU
This course centers on developing students' abilities to critically engage with dramatic productions. Our object of study will be the fall 2001 theater scene in London. We will develop skills in appreciating, discussing, evaluating and writing about theatrical productions. We will speculate also on the relationships reflective, constitutive, critical, and otherwise between these theatrical texts and the context of contemporary British cultural and political life. Selected readings and guest lectures will be included. D, WL. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 15.

Sem 1 ENGL-925-01 To be arranged Mr. Pence

926. Political Thought Since the English Civil War: From Absolutist Monarchy to the Welfare State (1600s-1945) 6 hours
6SS
Through a close reading of original texts, and using visit to museums, Parliament, and other relevant sites, the course will trace key themes and debates in British political thought. These will include: the proper functions and constitutional limits of political power; arguments for -- and against -- representative government; the social and political status of women; the place of economic self-interest in society; the role of empire; the emergence of socialist thought and demands for social equality; the role of the modern welfare state. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 15.

Sem 1 POLT-926-01 To be arranged Ms. Kruks

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Spring Semester Courses

900. The Danenberg Lectures on British Culture and Society 2 hours
2 EX
An introduction to the history and culture of Britain, examining the roots of contemporary London and Britain by exploring selected topics in social, political, and cultural history from antiquity to the modern era. The course will be coordinated by both instructors, but taught by a series of visiting experts (who will speak and lead discussions in their field) and supplemented by field trips to museums and pertinent historical sites. This course is for all students. Notes: CR/NE grading. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 26.

Sem 2 LOND-900-01 To be arranged Mr. Mayer and Mr. Orr

915. Environmental Problems and Human Behavior 6 hours
6SS
Unlike the United States, Britain has not been buffered by vast resources of land and mineral wealth. The challenges of making a transition to environmental sustainability have, therefore, a very different salience for citizens of Britain than for Americans, who still tend to define themselves, in David Potter's words, as "People of Plenty." For these reasons Britain is a good laboratory for the study of environmental problems and the adjustments required by the transition to sustainability in the 21st century. How have the British responded to the limitations of land and resources? How have they begun to perceive the challenge of sustainability? The largest part of this course will be aimed at answering these questions by meeting with scholars, members of Parliament, government officials, environmental activists, and journalists. Specifically, we intend to study (a) how the English people have or have not created institutions of common property management; and (b) the evolution of commensurate values, attitudes, behaviors, and expectations. What can Oberlin students learn from this experience? It is possible that British people may exhibit attitudes, anxieties, and behavior patterns that will come to characterize other "developed" societies as they adjust to the reality of calibrating their economic systems and expectations to more stringent ecological conditions.

Sem 2 ENST-915-01 To be arranged Mr. Orr
Sem 2 PSYC-915-01 To be arranged Mr. Mayer

916. Social Psychological Issues Raised in Theater and Art 6 hours
3HU, 3SS
The field of social psychology examines everyday behavior from a scientific perspective, developing theories of social behavior and testing these theories via experimentation. Issues related to self-worth, body image, stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination, liking and loving, aggression, and helping behavior are just a few of the topics that social psychologists study. Dramatic presentations provide an excellent vehicle for discussing these theories and topics. During the course of the semester, we will attend approximately six or seven plays and, on the basis of the social psychological literature, analyze them. Moreover, we will visit art museums and focus on issues related to self, self-worth, and images of beauty. Overall, then, this course is meant to be a broad introduction to the field of social psychology, and the richness of the London theater and art scene will provide a wonderful opportunity to study social psychological issues in a very engaging manner.

Sem 2 PSYC-916-01 To be arranged Mr. Mayer

917. Land and Food: Sustainable Agriculture in Britain 6 hours
6SS
A course on the evolution of British agriculture focused particularly on the emergence of 'sustainable' farming and land management practices in Britain since 1970. The course will include readings from classics by Oliver Rackham and Jaquetta Hawkes, lectures by leading agriculturalists, trips to sites of particular importance, and meetings with scientists involved in the BSE case.

Sem 2 ENST-917-01 To be arranged Mr. Orr

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