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History

Within the History Department's curriculum, one can study the history of a wide range of peoples, cultures, and institutions. Department members offer courses in the history of the United States, Europe, Russia, South and East Asia, Africa, and Latin America and the Caribbean. History classes examine these areas from a variety of broad historical perspectives, including political, social, cultural, intellectual, and economic. We also encourage students to explore history through a number of distinctive specializations such as women's history, labor history, environmental history, and the history of various groups including Jewish, Latino/Latina, and Asian American communities, among others. The most common entry into the history curriculum is through 100-level courses, either surveys, which cover a broad time span and geographical range, or colloquia for first- and second-year students, which explore particular historical problems or approaches in a small-class setting. Students interested concentrating in United States or other fields of history are encouraged to begin their studies in a First-Year Colloquium. In all fields, 200-level courses are largely topical, dealing with a more limited geography (one region or nation), time period, or historical problem. At the 300 and 400 levels, students can pursue advanced topics in small class settings, either colloquia or research seminars which provide focused training in historical research and writing. Many students arrange private readings with faculty members on topics of mutual interest. Some majors complete their work in the Department in the year-long honors (500-level) program.

Advanced Placement. Students with grades of 4 or 5 on the AP examination will be awarded credit in U.S. history (103 and 104) and/or in European history (History 102 only). AP credit is granted only during the first year that a student enrolls at Oberlin College.

Major. The history major consists of at least thirty hours in history courses. Work in the Department is divided into two sections, one including European and United States history, the other including African, Asian, Latin American, Caribbean, Russian, and early Jewish history. Students majoring in history are required to take a minimum of six hours in each section, and at least one 300-level or 400-level course in either section. Majors must take at least twenty hours of history from members of the Oberlin History Department. Ten hours may be transferred from approved study-away programs and from selected courses based on historical methodologies taught in African American Studies (African, African American, and Caribbean history), Women's Studies, and Classics (Greek and Roman history). Please direct any questions to the chair of the History Department. In consultation with their major advisor, students are expected to develop a balanced program of historical study culminating in a concentration, and to coordinate their major with course work in related disciplines suitable to their needs and interests.

Concentrations in the Major. The Department recommends that, with the help of an advisor, each major plan a concentration in the Department which will provide depth as well as breadth within the study of history. Concentrations in the major (at least five courses drawn from geographic, chronological, or thematic groupings), while not required, are designed to help a student think creatively about the study of history at Oberlin. The choice of a concentration field will depend on a number of factors including plans after graduation, particular interests, linguistic competencies, and staffing strengths in the Department. A fuller description of "Concentrations in the History Major" is available from History Department advisors, the History Department office, and our on-line home page (www.oberlin.edu/history).

Minor. The minor in history consists of not fewer than 15 hours of credit in history courses. These must include at least one 300- or 400-level course. Minors must take at least 10 hours of history from members of the Oberlin History Department.

Honors. The honors program in history offers the opportunity for recognition of distinguished achievement in historical research and writing. Qualified students are invited to enter the program in their seventh semester. Students wishing to be considered for honors should indicate that interest to the Department chair in their sixth semester. Further information is available from members of the Department. See also the general statement on honors.

Transfer of Credit. A maximum of 10 hours can be transferred toward the major.

Winter Term. Most members of the Department will be participating in Winter Term 2001 and will be available to sponsor projects. Please check with individual instructors to determine availability and possible projects.

History Online. For more information on the History Department, courses and instructors, please visit our home page at: www.oberlin.edu/history.

 

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Introductory Courses

101. Medieval European History 3 hours
3SS

An introductory level survey course extending from the fall of Rome through the "modernization" of medieval Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Topics will include the political and religious order in the early Middle Ages, conflict between Church and Empire, the urbanization of Europe, the culture of the High Middle Ages, the growth of secular monarchies, the Black Death, the Italian Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, and the Scientific Revolution.

Sem 1 HIST-101-01 MWF 2:30-3:20 Mr. Miller

102. Modern European History 3 hours
3SS

This introductory course surveys the histories of European peoples from the Old Regime to the end of the Cold War. Using a range of primary and secondary sources, we will examine the major landmarks in the social, political, and cultural histories of Europe. Topics include the decline of the society of orders, the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the Revolutions of 1848, European imperialism, the reconfiguration of gender roles, socialism, fascism, the world wars, and the rise and fall of the Cold War. Lecture and discussion format. Enrollment Limit: 60.

Sem 2 HIST-102-01 MW 12:00-1:15 Ms. Chin

103. American History to 1877: A Multimedia Approach 3 hours
3SS

Next offered 2002-2003.

104. American History: 1877-Present 3 hours
3SS

Next offered 2002-2003.


105. Chinese Civilization 3-4 hours
3-4SS, CD, WR (with 4th hour option)
An introduction to the history of China from the archeological origins of Chinese civilization to the period of the mature imperial state in the 17th century. The diverse origins of China's civilization are stressed. Topics in political, social, and economic history are explored, as well as developments in religion and thought, language and literature, and art. The course is the normal introduction to further study of Chinese history and culture and, in particular, provides a valuable context for themes treated in Modern China. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies 121. Notes: WR with 4th hour. option only. Enrollment Limit: 50.
Sem 1 HIST-105-01 MWF 10:00-10:50 Mr. Kelley

106. Modern China 3-4 hours
3-4SS, CD, WR (with 4th hour option)

Second semester. This history of China from the founding of the Manchu Qing (Ch'ing) dynasty in 1644 takes a China-centered perspective. Along with political and institutional developments, long-term changes in the society and economy of China are stressed, and the indigenous bases for those changes are explored so that China's twentieth-century revolutionary upheaval will be seen to be more than a "response to the Western impact" or an "emergence into modernity." Cross-listed with EAST 122. Notes: WR with 4th hour option only. Enrollment Limit: 50.
Sem 2 HIST-106-01 MWF 11:00-11:50 Mr. Kelley

107. Russian History I 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

Sem 1 HIST-107-01 To be arranged Staff

108. Russian History II 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

Sem2 HIST-108-01 To be arranged Staff

109. Latin American History: Conquest and Colony 3 hours
3SS, CD

An introductory survey of Latin American history centering on the imposition, maintenance, and decline of Spanish and Portuguese colonial rule in Latin America. Emphasis is placed on understanding pre-conquest native societies, the material and cultural basis of colonialism, the complex human mosaic fashioned in colonial Latin American after 1492, issues of gender in preconquest and colonial Latin America, and the nature and development of resistance within the colonial world. Enrollment Limit: 60.

Sem 1 HIST-109-01 MWF 9:00-9:50 Mr. Volk

110. Latin American History: State and Nation Since Independence 3 hours
3SS, CD

Next offered 2002-2003.

124. Women in Industrial America 3 hours
3SS

Next offered 2002-2003.

131. Jewish History From Biblical Antiquity to 1492 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

Identical to JWST 131.

Sem 1 HIST-131-01 TuTh 9:35-10:50 Ms. Magnus

132. Jewish History From Spanish Expulsion to the Present 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

Identical to JWST 132.

Sem 2 HIST-132-01 TuTh 11:00-12:15 Ms. Magnus

159. Traditional Japan to 1868 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

A thematic investigation of traditional Japanese civilization to 1868. Attention will be given to the early process of Sinicization, the rise of the warrior class, the isolationism of the Tokugawa Period, and the initial confrontation with the West in the 19th century. In addition to political and international developments, treatment of aesthetics and religion will also be featured. Identical to EAST 131. Enrollment Limit: 75.
Sem 1 HIST-159-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Mr. Di Cenzo

160. Modern Japan, 1868 to Present 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

From the collapse of the Tokugawa regime in 1868 and the Meiji Restoration to the present. The focus will be the modern Western challenge and the Japanese response. Attention will be given to political, international, intellectual, and artistic/aesthetic aspects. Identical to EAST 132. Enrollment Limit: 100.

Sem 2 HIST-160-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Mr. Di Cenzo

162. Cultures and Peoples of Ancient India 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

163. Modern South Asia: From British Imperialism to the Present 3-4 hours
3-4SS, CD, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

170. World War II: Shaping the 20th Century 3 hours
3SS

Next offered 2002-2003.

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Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students

112. The Bourgeoisie and the Making of Modern Europe 3 hours
3SS, WRi
For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students."

Sem 2 HIST-112-01 W 7:00-9:00 p.m. Ms. Chin

113. The French Revolution and the Origins of Modern Europe 3 hours
3SS, WRi

Next offered 2002-2003.

115. Colloquium: The American City, 1870-1970 3 hours
3SS
Next offered 2002-2003.

116. Russian Social Thought 3 hours
3SS, CD, WRi
Next offered 2002-2003.

117. National Schizophrenia in Japan and Sub-Saharan Africa 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR
For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students."

Sem 1 HIST-117-01 Tu 1:00-2:50 Mr. Di Cenzo

119. The 1960s 3 hours
3SS, CD, WRi
For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students."

Sem 2 HIST-119-01 TuTh 11:00-12:15 Mr. Jung

141. The Gilded Age 3 hours
3SS, WRi
For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students."

Sem 1 HIST-141-01 Tu 1:00-2:50 Mr. Mitchell

145. Water in American History 3 hours
3SS, WRi
For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students."

Sem 1 HIST 145-01 TuTh 3:00-4:15 Ms. Stroud.

147. Women's Lives, Women's Activism in American History 3 hours
3SS, Wri, CD
Next offered 2002-2003.

148. The Collision of Cultures in North America, ca. 1500-1700 3 hours
3SS, WR, CD
For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students."

Sem 1 HIST-148-01 TuTh 1:30-2:45 Mr. Kornblith

149. Approaches to World History 3 hours
3SS, WRi, CD
For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students."

Sem 2 HIST-148-01 TuTh 11:00-12:15 Mr. Kelley

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Topical Courses in European History

201. History of Science from Antiquity through the Scientific Revolution 3 hours
3SS, WR
This is a survey course tracing the development of scientific thinking and conceptions of nature in classical antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the early modern period. Special attention will be given to the development of scientific methods and to connections to broader cultural and intellectual institutions. Topics will include the relationship between nature and logic, the Aristotelian system, Hellenistic science and ethical philosophy; twelfth-century naturalism; scholastic science; Renaissance conceptions of nature; Copernicanism, mechanistic conceptions of nature. Enrollment Limit: 35.

Sem 1 HIST-201-01 TuTh 11:00-12:15 Mr. Miller

202. Renaissance, Reformation, and the Making of Early Modern Europe 3 hours
3SS
A survey course focusing on the end of the Middle Ages and the beginnings of Early Modern Europe. Topics will include the culture and politics of the Italian Renaissance, Humanism in northern Europe, the Reformation and late medieval religion, the Catholic reformation, new forms of disciplining and spirituality, the voyages of discovery, the wars of religion, and the emergence of the modern state system. Enrollment Limit: 35.

Sem 2 HIST-202-01 TuTh 11:00-12:15 Mr. Miller

203. Humanism and Reform 3 hours
3SS, WRi
Next offered 2002-2003.

204. Medieval Intellectual History 3-4 hours
3-4SS, WR
Next offered 2002-2003.

222. Transnational Europe 3 hours
3SS, CD
This topical survey course examines what historians and other scholars have called the "New Europe" and its transnational cultures. It looks at the ways that Western European countries--especially France, Britain, and Germany--have been forced to move beyond rigid national boundaries by the new immigrants and institutional structures of the post-1945 period. Explicitly comparative in nature, this course explores both the similarities and differences among Western European countries in their attitudes towards and approaches to such topics as Europeanization, citizenship rights, cultural difference, and minority resistance. Enrollment Limit: 35.

Sem 1 HIST-222-01 TuTh 11:00-12:15 Ms. Chin

223. Ethnic Minorities in Central Europe 3 hours
3SS, CD
Next offered 2002-2003.

224. Twentieth Century Europe, I: 1900-1945 3 hours
3SS
Next offered 2002-2003.

225. Twentieth Century Europe, II: 1945-Present 3 hours
3SS
Next offered 2002-2003.

233. Jewish Memoirs And Memory: Writing The Self In Jewish Society 3-4 hours
3-4SS, CD, WR
Identical to JWST 233.

Sem 1 HIST-233-01 TuTh 3:00-4:15 Ms. Magnus

234. Good & Evil: Decision-Making in the Holocaust 3-4 hours
3-4SS, CD, WR
Identical to JWST 234.

Sem 2 HIST-234-01 TuTh 1:30-2:45 Ms. Magnus

237. Women in Jewish Society: Antiquity to Modernity 3 hours
3SS
Next offered 2002-2003.

238. East European Jewry: From Polish Partition to 1939 3 hours
3SS
Next offered 2002-2003.

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Topical Courses in American History

252. American Environmental History 3 hours
3SS, WR

This course will consider the major themes of U.S. Environmental History, examining changes in the American landscape, the development of ideas about nature in the United States, and the history of U.S. environmental activism. Throughout the course, we will be exploring definitions of nature, environment, and environmental history. Enrollment Limit: 35.

Sem 1 HIST-252-01 TuTh 9:35-10:50 Ms. Stroud

253. Recent America: The United States Since World War II 3 hours
3SS, WR

In this course, we will focus on the themes of reform and reaction as we examine changes in American culture, politics, and landscapes since World War II. Through discussions of the Cold War, the Civil Rights movement, environmental activism, surburbanization, and the rise of conservatism, we will consider the ways in which Americans changed their lives, homes and institutions in the second half of the twentieth century. Enrollment limit 35.

Sem 2 HIST-253-01 TuTh 9:35-10:50 Ms. Stroud

254. Radical Traditions 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

A survey of radical movements that have challenged prevailing socioeconomic, political, and cultural norms in U.S. society since the Civil War, including: Radical Republicanism, labor unionism, Populism, socialism, communism, feminism, Third World nationalism, and gay liberation. Emphasis on the forces that have united, divided, undermined, and transformed the American left. Enrollment Limit: 35.

Sem 1 HIST 254-01 TuTh 11:00-12:15 Mr. Jung

257. American Intellectual History, 1860 to the Present 3 hours
3SS, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

258. The Industrial Revolution in America 3 hours
3SS, QPh

Next offered 2002-2003.

260. Asian American History 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

An introductory history of Asian Indians, Chinese, Filipinos, Japanese, and Koreans in the United States from the 1840s to the 1960s. Major themes include imperialism, labor migration, racism, community formation, and resistance. Lecture and discussion format. Enrollment Limit: 35.

Sem 1 HIST 260-01 TuTh 3:00-4:15 Mr. Jung

262. 20th Century U.S. Cultural and Intellectual History 3 hours
3SS, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

263. The American Civil War and Reconstruction 4 hours
4SS, CD, WR

A critical examination of the causes, dynamics, and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include slavery and the development of the sectional crisis; antislavery politics and the emergence of the Republican party; secession; the military experience; the meaning of emancipation; and the dilemmas of Reconstruction. Emphasis on primary sources and recent scholarship in social and political history. Lectures, discussions, videos, and considerable use of educational technology. Recommended preparation: History 103 or its equivalent. Enrollment Limit: 30.

Sem. 1 HIST 263-01 MW2:30-3:20, F2:30-4:20. Mr. Kornblith

264. Aliens and Citizens 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

The U.S. is often depicted as the "nation of nations," whose history is defined by its liberal incorporation of diverse peoples into the national citizenry. We will investigate this image of U.S. history and society through legal statutes and decisions on immigration, naturalization, and citizenship as well as movements to exclude and assimilate those deemed "aliens." How have race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality shaped the legal and cultural understanding of American citizenship? Lecture and discussion format. Enrollment Limit: 35.

Sem 2. HIST-264-01 TuTh 3:00-4:15 Mr. Jung

265. American Sexualities 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

This course will examine the creation, maintenance, and reproduction of sexual differences and identities over a broad time span in North American history, beginning with Native American sexual practices and social formations, and stretching through the "modernization" of sex. Major topics will include marriage, changing gender roles, the intersection of sexuality with race and ethnicity, commercialized sex, reproduction, same sex sexual practices, contraception, sexual violence, heterosexism, danger, desire, and pleasure. Enrollment Limit: 40.

Sem 2. HIST-265-01 TuTh 9:35-10:50 Mr. Mitchell

266. Women and Social Movements in the United States 3 hours
3SS, CD

Why, when, and how have women organized for social change in American history? In what ways has women's activism differed from men's? To what extent have women's motives and ideologies been characterized by gendered perspectives on society? This course examines the participation of American women in a series of major social movements over the past two centuries, including those for the abolition of slavery, suffrage, a welfare state, and civil rights. Enrollment Limit: 35.

Sem 2 HIST-266-01 MW 2:30-3:45 Ms. Lasser

267. Gender, Ethnicity, and Race in 19th Century America 3-4 hours
3-4SS, CD

Next offered 2002-2003.

268. Oberlin History as American History 3-4 hours
3-4SS, CD

Explores episodes in Oberlin's history as a multicultural community within the larger context of American history and introduces methods for use in primary research. Topics include abolition, civil rights, religion, education, women's rights, and civic improvement. Students may collaborate on local history projects in the Oberlin public schools. Enrollment Limit: 35.

Sem 1 HIST-268-01 TuTh 9:00-10:50 Ms. Lasser

269. Nation of Joiners: Voluntarism and Social 3-4 hours
Movements in America

3-4SS

Next offered 2002-2003.

270. Latina/Latino Survey 3 hours
3SS, WR, CD

What historical forces have brought together diverse groups including Chicanos from Los Angeles, Cubans from Miami, and Dominicans and Puerto Ricans from New York City? From the sixteenth century to the present, we map the varied terrains of Latina/o history. Major themes include conquest and resistance, immigration, work, and the creation of racial and sexual differences within and between Latino/a communities. We survey Latina/o writers from Cabeza de Baca to José Martí to Gloria Anzaldúa. Enrollment Limit: 40.

Sem 1 HIST-270-01 TuTh 9:35-10:50 Mr. Mitchell

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Topical Courses in Asian History

282. The Invention of Asia 3 hours
3SS, CD

First semester. A lecture and discussion course which examines the contact Europeans and Americans have had with Asian societies and peoples from antiquity to modern times and how they 'invented' a variety of Asias. Key questions include: How do these conceptions of Asia reflect on Westerners' changing attitudes toward their own societies and on historical and intellectual developments in the modern West? How have they mediated Western contact with Asians and Asian societies? Enrollment Limit: 25.

Sem 1 HIST-282-01 MWF 9:00 9:50 Mr. Kelley

284. Cultural History of Medieval Japan 3 hours
3SS, CD

Next offered 2002-2003.

285. Intellectual History of the Meiji Period (1886-1912) 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

Next offered 2003-2004.

287. Islamic South Asia: Roots and Emergence of India, 3 hours
Pakistan and Bangladesh

3SS, CD, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

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Topical Courses in Latin American History

293. Dirty Wars and Democracy 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

294. The United States and Latin America 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

A critical evaluation of U.S. foreign policy toward Latin America, as well as other aspects of the interaction between the United States and Latin America, from the Monroe Doctrine to the present. Besides formal aspects of U.S. policy making, students will also consider the manner in which Latin America and Latin Americans are represented in the United States and cultural influences on policy making. Lecture and discussion format with opportunity for original research. Recommended preparation: HIST-110. Enrollment Limit: 40.

Sem 2 HIST 294-01 TuTh 9:35-10:50 Mr Volk

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Topical Courses in Russian History

296. Russia Before Peter the Great 3 hours
3SS, CD

Next offered 2002-2003.

297. Russia and the Soviet Union Since 1941 3 hours
3SS, CD

Next offered 2002-2003.

298. Russia and the Soviet Union Since 1941 - Film 1 hour
1SS

Next offered 2002-2003.

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Colloquia

European History Colloquia

300. Science and History from the Middle Ages to the 17th Century 3 hours
3SS, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

301. Machiavelli and the Renaissance 3 hours
3SS, WRi

Next offered 2002-2003.

303. Critical Issues in the Renaissance and Reformation 3 hours
3SS, WRi

Next offered 2002-2003.

304. The Classical Tradition in the Middle Ages and Renaissance 3 hours
3SS, WRi

Next offered 2002-2003.

305. Jewish Women, Jewish Men, the Jewish Family 3 hours
and the Jewish Community

3SS

Next offered 2002-2003.

306. German Jewry 3 hours
3SS

Next offered 2002-2003.

308. Heresy and Orthodoxy in Medieval Europe 3 hours
3SS, WRi

This is an upper-division seminar which uses primary sources and historiographic debates to examine the interaction between heretical movements and the development of orthodox beliefs and practices in the Latin Middle Ages. Topics include: gnosticism and the birth of heresiological literature; Pelagianism and the development of Christian attitudes toward sexuality; literacy and popular heresy; the women's religious movement in the High Middle Ages; the Inquisition. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 15.

Sem2 HIST-308-01 Tu 7:00-9:00PM Mr. Miller

310. Marx and Nietzsche 3 hours
3SS, WRi

Next offered 2002-2003.

311. Jewish Memory, Jewish Memoirs 3 hours
3SS, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

313. Seminar. Topics in Jewish History 3 hours
3SS

Next offered 2002-2003.

315. Gender in Modern European History 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

316. Cultural Reactions to Modernization 3 hours
3SS, WR

This upper-level seminar begins by attempting to define the concept of "modernity" and the processes of modernization that emerged at the beginning of the 19th century. It then turns to specific cultural reactions--conservative, liberal, and everything in between--to modernity and modernization. Some of the central topics will include: bohemianism, the avant-garde, debates about technology, and fascism. Prerequisite: HIST 102. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.

Sem.1 HIST 316-01 Tu 7:00-9:00PM Ms. Chin.

358. British Empire in England 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.


American History Colloquia

323. Liberty and Power, Democracy and Slavery in Jacksonian America 4 hours
4SS, CD, WR

The cultural dynamics, social relations, and political structures that shaped the lives of ordinary Americans -- black and white, male and female, rich and poor, urban and rural, native born and immigrant, Indian and other -- between approximately 1820 and 1850. Among the topics to be examined are Indian Removal, the Second Great Awakening, abolitionism, temperance, gender roles, nativism, proslavery ideology, and slave resistance. Emphasis will be placed on current scholarly debates and different approaches to historical analysis. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 15.

Sem 2 HIST 323-01 TuTh 1:30-2:45 Mr. Kornblith

325. Native American History, ca. 1450-1900 4 hours
4SS, CD, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

326. Frontiers of Native America 3 hours
3SS, WRi, CD

Next offered 2002-2003.

327. Borderlands 3 hours
3SS, WRi, CD

The American Southwest, roughly the US-Mexico border area from Texas to California, is a political, economic, and cultural crossroads. We will investigate interactions between Native Americans and Spanish colonists beginning in the sixteenth century, emerging US economic and political control during the nineteenth century, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, land dispossession, the Mexican Revolution, immigration, civil rights, and twentieth century demography. We also discuss borderlands as a literary and symbolic concept. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 15.

Sem 1 HIST-327-01 W 2:30-4:20 Mr. Mitchell

328 American Mixed Blood 3 hours
3SS, WR, CD

From the coyote and the half-breed to the "tragic" mulatto, people of mixed ethnic and racial heritage occupy a conflicted and controversial place in American history. This course will chart the histories of people of mixed heritage from the colonial period to the present, exploring the relationship between the historical experiences of mixed heritage and broader trends in American history including slavery, imperialism, legal transformation, and changing cultural patterns. We will also consider current social theories of hybridity and mestizaje. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 15.

Sem 2 HIST-328-01 W 7:00-9:00 p.m. Mr. Mitchell

330. American Landscapes 3 hours
3SS, WRi

Next offered 2002-2003.

331. Colloquium in Asian American History 3 hours
3SS, CD, WRi

A seminar that explores particular topics in Asian American history. This semester, we will focus on how Asian Americans have figured in various social movements, as targets, allies, and participants. For example, how did anti-Asianism define and fuel the labor movement? How have Asian Americans struggled for their own rights as workers, colonial subjects, women, queers, and racialized Others? Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.

Sem 2 HIST 331-01 W 2:30-4:20 Mr. Jung

338. Colloquium in U.S. Urban Environmental History 3 hours
3SS, WRi

In this course, we will be looking at changing urban environments, environmental influences on cities, the environmental impact of urban places, and the concerns and influence of urban environmental activists in the United States, from the colonial period to the present. We will be questioning the anti-urban bias of much environmental history, and interrogating definitions of "nature" and "culture" that place people and their habitats outside of the "natural" world. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12

Sem 2 HIST 338-01 W 2:30-4:20 Ms. Stroud

339. The Movies, Popular Culture, and Moral Conflict 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

390. Slavery, Antislavery and Emancipation in American History 4 hours
4SS, CD, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

339. The Movies, Popular Culture, and Moral Conflict 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

390. Slavery, Antislavery and Emancipation in American History 4 hours
4SS, CD, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

Asian History Colloquia

340. China's Path to Revolution 3 hours
3 SS, CD, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

344. Colloquium: Gender, Marriage, and Family in China 3-4 hours
3-4SS, WR, CD

First semester. A colloquium exploring the construction of gender, varieties of marriage, and conceptions of family in China from imperial times to the present. Special attention will be paid to the state's attempts to shape ideals and enforce norms in these areas, along with the response of both women and men of various social classes to those efforts. Suggested preparation: History 105, History 106, or equivalent. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.

Sem 1 HIST-344-01 M 2:30-4:20 Mr. Kelley

345. Social Movements in China, Late Imperial Times to the Present 3-4 hours
3-4SS, CD, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

350. Women in Modern Japan, 1868 to the Present 3 hours
3SS, CD

A chronological approach to the quest for gender equality in Japan during the period 1868 to the present. Sources will include literary and historical texts written by both Japanese and American authors. Prerequisites: HIST 160/EAST 132. Identical to WOST 350. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 10.
Sem 1 HIST-350-01 Th 1:00-2:50 Mr. DiCenzo

351. National Schizophrenia and the Modern Japanese Novel 3 hours
3SS, CD

Next offered 2002-2003.

356. The British Empire in Asia and Africa 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

357. Non-Violent Opposition to British Imperialism: M. Gandhi 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

360. History of Vietnam 3-4 hours
3-4SS, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

Latin American History Colloquia

365. Peasants, State, and Rebellion in Latin America 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

366. Gender Issues in Latin American History 3 hours
3SS, CD

Next offered 2002-2003.

Russian History Colloquia

314. Comparative Studies in Labor History 3-4 hours
3-4SS, CD, WRi

Next offered 2002-2003.

372. Readings in Russian Women's History 3-4 hours
3-4SS, CD, WRi

Next offered 2002-2003.

373. Modern Russian Women's History 3-4 hours
3-4SS, CD, WRi

Next offered 2002-2003.

379. Stalinism 3-4 hours
3-4SS, WRi

Next offered 2002-2003.

Methodology Colloquia

312. Museums and the Shaping of Knowledge 3 hours
3SS, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

316. The Body as Historical Subject 3 hours
3SS, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

367. Narrating the Nation: Historical and Literary Approaches to Nationalism 4 hours
2HU, 2SS, CD, WR

This course offers an analysis of the narratives through which nationalisms acquire credibility and authority. This discussion-centered class will examine the nationalisms of Latin America, the Caribbean, and South Asia with particular reference to those of Argentina, Mexico, Chile, Haiti, and India. Narrative theories as deployed in and by the disciplines of History and English literary studies provide the overarching critical methodologies for interdisciplinary analysis. Identical to ENG 386. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 25.

Sem 1 HIST-367-01 MWF 12:00-1:15 Mr. Volk, Ms. Needham

380. Method in African History: In Search of Africans' Voices 3 hours
3SS, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

395. Method in European History 3 hours
3SS, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

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Research Seminars

405. Research Seminar: World War II 3 hours
3SS, WRi
Next offered 2003-2004.

406. Research Seminar: World War I 3 hours
3SS, WR
Next offered 2002-2003.

407. Research Seminar: European Cultural and Intellectual History 3 hours
3SS, WRi
This advanced research seminar provides students with the opportunity to write a major paper (25-30 pages) on a topic in modern European cultural and intellectual history, using published primary documents in translation and extensive secondary literature. Common readings for the first few weeks of the course will examine different approaches to cultural and intellectual history, and specifically highlight the ways in which these two fields have come to mutually inform each other. Prerequisite: HIST 102. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 12.

Sem 2 HIST-407-01 M 7:00-9:00 p.m. Ms. Chin

423. Research in American Environmental History 3 hours
3SS, WR
Next offered 2002-2003.

442. Democracy and Human Rights in China 3-4 hours
3-4SS, WR, CD
Next offered 2002-2003.

451. Japan in the Post-World War II International Arena 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR
This seminar will explore Japan's quest for an independent international presence following its postwar occupation by the U.S.A, and the ways in which that occupation and the legacy of World War II in Asia have influenced that quest. Students will do intensive research in English-language sources with a view to producing a major paper (25 pages). Prerequisite: HIST 160/EAST 132. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 8.

Sem 2 HIST-451-01 Th 1:00-2:50 Mr. DiCenzo

452. Japanese Domestic History Since the End of the Second World War 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR
Next offered 2002-2003.

VI. Individual Projects

501, 502. Senior Honors 1-3 hours
1-3SS
Students wishing to do Honors in History during their final year should consult their Major Advisor or the Chair of History, submitting an Honors Proposal by the established deadline the semester prior to their final year. Honors work consists of preparation of an Honors Thesis under the direction of one or more Thesis Directors. Consent of Department required.

995. Private Reading 1-3 hours
1-3SS

Independent study of a subject beyond the range of catalog course offerings. Consent of instructor required. Private readings will be sponsored by Mr. Baumann, Ms. Chin, Mr. DiCenzo, Ms. Dye, Mr. Jung, Mr. Kelley, Mr. Koppes, Mr. Kornblith, Ms. Lasser, Mr. Miller, Mr. Mitchell, Ms. Stroud, and Mr. Volk.

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