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English

The curriculum of the Department of English is intended to introduce students to the main literary genres, to acquaint them with representative works in important periods of English, American, and Anglophone literature, and to aid them in developing methods for critical interpretation.

Further information about the department, faculty and courses is available at the department's home page on the web (www.oberlin.edu/~english).

Advanced Placement. Students will receive 3 hours of Oberlin College credit for a score of 5 on the Advanced Placement Examination in English Literature/Composition or English Language/ Composition, and will be eligible for entry into intermediate (200-level) courses in English.

Colloquia. These small, Writing-Intensive classes are for first-year students only, and do not count as part of the English major. They will focus on the essential skills of reading, analysis, writing, and discussion. The successful completion of any first-year colloquium will count as prerequisite for intermediate work in English, as will a Writing Intensive course in any other department, or certification of writing proficiency in any Writing Certification course in the Humanities division.

200-Level Courses. English majors are expected to complete three or more courses at the 200 level. Others interested in study in the department are encouraged to do some work at this level. These courses are designed to introduce students to the discipline of literary study in English through a substantial coverage of texts, instruction in the conventions of genre, period, and region as appropriate, and attention to fundamental issues and approaches in critical reading and writing. Some of these courses are survey courses, others are more closely focused in subject, but all are intended to provide students with an understanding of important critical issues and approaches, as well as sustained experience in reading texts and in writing critical and interpretive papers.

300-Level Courses. Courses at the 300 level are intended for students who have completed at least three courses at the 200 level. These advanced courses are smaller in size to facilitate more intensive study than the 200-level courses.

400-Level Courses. At the 400 level seniors (and occasionally juniors) will have the opportunity to do individual work based on focused reading of texts, criticism, literary history, or theory, with the goal of engaging in extended research, writing, or performance projects. Such opportunities are available through seminars, special topics courses, the honors program, or (in particular cases) independent projects.

Major. The English major is designed to meet the needs of students with various goals, including those who desire training in English in preparation for graduate study in the field; those seeking a foundation for postgraduate work or study in fields related to English (e.g., education, communications, editing and publishing, law, theater); and those who want a humanistic base in reading, thinking, and writing for a liberal arts education.

Students interested in going on for graduate work in English should be aware that their candidacy will be strengthened by the following: readiness to define a likely direction or area of ongoing scholarly interest; evidence of the ability to conduct successful independent research and extended critical writing; reading knowledge of at least one foreign language; and a more ample distribution of historical period courses than that minimally required by the major. Students should consult with their advisors about the decision to go on for graduate work in English.

The Department offers two types of majors, regular and concentration majors, described in detail below. The regular major is primarily a course of study within the discipline of English; the concentration majors are interdisciplinary. The following describes the majors now in effect; those who declared a major before spring 1998 should see below, "Previously declared majors."

Students may count toward the English major (at the 200 level) one college course (up to 3 credit hours) in non-English literature, whether read in the original or in translation. This course will not satisfy an area distribution requirement, but may satisfy a genre requirement as appropriate (see below).

For students who entered Oberlin before 1998, the revised English major will accommodate as equivalent to the new and renumbered 200-level courses (a) those courses formerly numbered 151, 152, and 153; and (b) any courses already completed at the 300 level.

English majors are strongly encouraged but not required to enroll in at least one course at the 400 level in their senior year. Majors should consult with their advisors in the middle of the junior year to plan for the specific senior work, whether a special topics course or seminar, the honors program, or a senior project option (see below, "Senior options"). See the department's web site for further information about the major.

The regular major in English consists of 27 hours, including:

* at least 3 courses at the 200 level

* at least 4 courses at the 300 level or higher.

These courses must also satisfy the following distribution requirements: two courses in English literature before 1790 (designated EL below), one course in British or world literature since 1790 (WL), and two courses in American literature (AL). They must also include at least one course primarily in poetry (P), one in narrative fiction (F), and one in drama (D). Checklists for working out these requirements are available from the department office (Rice 130).

Concentration Majors. There are six concentration majors. Based in the discipline of English, these concentrations allow students to concentrate on particular aspects of literary study by bringing work in other disciplines to bear on their major in English -- in particular, work in African-American Studies, American Literature and Culture, Creative Writing, Modern Culture and Media, Theater and Drama, and Women's Studies. These concentration majors consist of 21 hours in English and 15 hours outside of English.

For all concentration majors, courses in English must include:

* 3 courses at the 200 level

* 3 courses (4 for American Literature and Culture, or Modern Culture and Media) at the 300 level or higher.

* As with the standard major these courses must fulfill certain distribution requirements: one course each with the designation EL, WL, and AL, and courses in two of the three genres (P, F, and D).

Specific requirements for concentration majors, in addition to the general requirements above:

* African-American: in English: 3 courses with strong focus on African-American or Third World literature with a significant treatment of the literature of Africa and/or the African diaspora; Outside English: 15 hours in African-American/Third World Studies courses, including no more than one literature course.

* American Literature and Culture: in English: 4 courses in American literature and culture; Outside English: 15 hours in courses dealing with American culture in History, Art History, African-American Studies, etc.

* Creative Writing: in English: 3 courses in 20th-century literature, including one in post-1945 literature; Outside English: 15 hours in the Creative Writing Program, a minimum of 10 hours of which must be in the form of coursework offered for Creative Writing credit by Creative Writing Program Committee faculty.

* Modern Culture and Media: in English: 4 courses dealing with issues in modern culture and media; Outside English: 15 hours in courses dealing with modern culture and media.

* Theater and Drama: in English: 3 courses in dramatic literature, playwriting, or other drama or film topic; Outside English: 15 hours (total) in at least two other areas (dramatic literature, theater, film) to be chosen from among courses such as these: courses in Theater and design/technical areas; film courses; other literature courses in translation or in the original language of which the substance is drama.

* Women's Studies: in English: 3 courses with a strong feminist or Women's Studies component; Outside English: 15 hours from courses listed in the catalog under Women's Studies; one of these courses must be Women's Studies 100; the rest may include up to 3 hours in courses listed as "Related Courses" in Women's Studies; the remainder must be from courses listed as "Program Courses" or "Cross-Listed Courses."

In consultation with the department chairperson, majors may devise other concentrations to meet their particular interests. Because concentration majors require more advance planning than the standard English major, they may not be declared after the end of the student's junior year. Students who choose a concentration major have no automatic entitlement to courses outside the English Department required for that major (in contrast, places are reserved in English courses for English majors, including concentration majors).

Minor. An English minor consists of at least 15 hours in the English Department including:

* 3 courses at the 200 level

* 2 courses at the 300 level or higher.

* As with the major, these courses must fulfill certain distribution requirements: one course each with the designation EL, WL, and AL, and courses in two of the three genres (P, F, and D).

Senior Options. Senior English majors are strongly recommended to do work at the 400 level, because of the value of intense and extended work among peers at an advanced level of practical and theoretical skills. There are 3 principal options for senior work:

Seminars and Special Topics Courses. These courses are normally for seniors who have completed at least two courses at the 300 level. Seminars will be available only by consent of the instructor, through application in the preceding semester. Whether focusing on specific authors, genres, periods, or movements, or more broadly conceived around theoretical or methodological approaches, these seminars will give students the chance for extended focused study within a specific area, culminating in a major research project or term paper.

Senior Projects. The senior project is a semester-long individual research project culminating typically in a 15-20 page essay and an oral presentation of that work to a group of faculty. Permission to do a senior project is by application in the semester before the project and is available to a limited number of students.

Honors. The Honors Program is a year-long project involving a colloquium in the fall, as well as year-long work on a research project, leading to a 35-page essay or creative writing project and an oral examination on that project. Successful work in the Honors program will render a student eligible for consideration for honors at graduation, but it does not guarantee such honors.

Admission to the Honors program is by application in the spring of the junior year; all majors are invited by mail to apply for the program. Admission to the program is determined on the basis of the strength of an applicant's work in the major as evidenced by grade-point average in the major, faculty recommendations, and personal interviews as needed. Students are advised to have completed the majority of their major requirements by the time they apply for honors, including area and genre distribution requirements and the specific requirements of a concentration major, and to have done significant work at the advanced level.

Previously Declared Majors. Students who declared a major in English prior to the establishment (in 1998) of the guidelines described here may be certified to have completed the major by meeting the former requirements, which specified thirty hours within the Department, including completion of three regular courses (excluding private readings) in literature before 1900, at least two of which must be in literature before 1800.

London Program. One semester each year, an English Department faculty member serves as co-director of the Danenberg Oberlin-in-London Program, thereby facilitating applications for English majors interested in that semester's program. For further information see the section of the catalog entitled "London Program."

Transfer of Credit. No more than 14 hours of transfer credit in English literature may be applied to the Oberlin English major. (Note: "English Literature" generally excludes basic composition, introductory creative writing, and more than one course in literature not written in English.) To have transfer credit approval toward the major and/or toward meeting prerequisites for upper-level courses, students should consult the chair of the English Department (or his designate), preferably with syllabi in hand.

Winter Term. Winter Term projects sponsored by English faculty will be according to the interests and availability of staff. Students also are encouraged to propose group projects which, with an approved sponsor, they will direct.

Composition Courses

Students interested in taking introductory-level courses in writing should also see the Rhetoric and Composition section of this catalog. Descriptions of writing-oriented courses and procedures to be followed in order to meet the college-wide writing requirements may be found there.

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Colloquia

Colloquia will focus on critical writing and analysis through the study of texts. These colloquia are for first-year students only, and do not count for the English major, which begins with foundation courses at the 200 level. All colloquia are Writing Intensive courses. Students in their second year or beyond should begin work in the English Department at the 200 level.

119. Media and Memory 3 hours
3HU, WRi

For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students."

Sem 2 ENGL-119-01 TuTh 11:00-12:15 Mr. Pence

121. To Be Announced 3 hours
3HU, WRi

For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students."

Sem 1 ENGL-121-01 TuTh 1:30-2:45 Ms. Bryan

124. The Sense of Time and Place 3 hours
3HU, WRi

For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students."

Sem 1 ENGL-124-01 MWF 10:00-10:50 Mr. Day

125. Shakespeare and History 3 hours
3HU, WRi

For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students."

Sem 1 ENGL-125-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Mr. Pierce

ENGL-125-02 MWF 3:30-4:20 Mr. Pierce

128. Theater, Politics, and Community 3 hours
3HU, WRi

For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students."

Sem 1 ENGL-128-01 TuTh 9:35-10:50 Ms. Geis

ENGL-128-02 TuTh 11:00-12:15 Ms. Geis

131. Forms of Dialogue 3 hours
3HU, WRi

For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students."

Sem 1 ENGL-131-01 MWF 9:00-9:50 Mr. Hobbs

134. Novels of Development 3 hours
3HU, WRi

For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students."

Sem 2 ENGL-134-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Ms. Linehan

ENGL-134-02 MWF 3:30-4:20 Ms. Linehan

146. Art and Authenticity: Reading U.S. Minority Literatures 3 hours
3HU, WRi

For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students."

Sem 1 ENGL-146-01 MWF 9:00-9:50 Ms. Motooka

ENGL-146-02 MWF 11:00-11:50 Ms. Motooka

148. Pedagogies of Empire 3 hours
3HU, WRi

For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students."

Sem 1 ENGL-148-01 TuTh 8:35-9:50 Ms. Needham

ENGL-148-02 TuTh 1:30-2:45 Ms. Needham

155. W. B. Yeats and the Irish Renaissance 3 hours
3HU, WRi

For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students."

Sem 1 ENGL-155-01 TuTh 9:35-10:50 Mr. Olmsted

ENGL-155-02 TuTh 11:00-12:15 Mr. Olmsted

177. Ways of Seeing, Ways of Knowing 3 hours
3HU, WRi

For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students."

Sem 1 ENGL-177-01 MWF 11:00-11:50 Ms. Zagarell

ENGL-177-02 MWF 2:30-3:20 Ms. Zagarell

181. Middle Passage and Migration in the African-American Imagination 3 hours 3HU, CD, WRi
For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students."

Sem 1 ENGL-181-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Ms. Johns

188. To Be Announced 3 hours
3HU, WRi

For full course description see section entitled "Colloquia for First- and Second-Year Students."

Sem 2 ENGL-188-01 MWF 10:00-10:50 Staff

ENGL-188-02 MWF 1:30-2:20 Staff

 

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200-Level Courses

These courses are designed to introduce students to the discipline of literary study in English through a substantial coverage of texts, instruction in the conventions of genre, period, and region as appropriate, and attention to fundamental issues and approaches in critical reading and writing.

Prerequisites: These courses are open to students who have completed any Writing Intensive course, or have gained Writing Certification in any course in the Humanities. They are also open to those who have achieved a 5 on the AP exam in English Language/Composition or English Literature/Composition, or a score of 710 or better on the SAT II Writing test. Other students may be admitted by consent of the instructor, with the understanding that students should be able to demonstrate the ability to handle writing, discussion, and analysis in ways typically taught in Writing Intensive classes.

201. Chaucer 3 hours
3HU, WR

A study of Geoffrey Chaucer's poetry, to be read in Middle English, with particular attention to The Canterbury Tales; and with emphasis on the medieval setting in which the poet wrote. P, EL. Prerequisite: See headnote above. Enrollment Limit: 30.

Sem 1 ENGL-201-01 TuTh 9:35-10:50 Ms. Bryan

207. Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Poetry 3 hours
3HU, WR

Non-dramatic poetry from the period 1580-1660, with special attention to Sidney, Shakespeare, Donne, Herbert, and Marvell. The course will consider how these poems participate in discourses of love in the Early Modern period. P, EL. Prerequisite: See headnote above. Enrollment Limit: 30.

Sem 1 ENGL-207-01 W 7:00-10:00 pm Mr. Pierce


212. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature 3 hours

3HU, WR

We will read representative British works of the late-seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, focusing on the articulation of individualism and its meanings in the age that witnessed the birth of modern democracy. P, EL. Prerequisite: See headnote above. Enrollment Limit: 30.

Sem 2 ENGL-212-01 TuTh 3:00-4:15 Ms. Motooka

216. Studies in Shakespeare 3 hours
3HU, WR

Selected plays by Shakespeare, studied with reference to issues of historical context and contemporary performance. D, EL. Prerequisite: See headnote above. Enrollment Limit: 30.

Sem 1 ENGL-216-01 TuTh 9:35-10:50 Staff

ENGL-216-02 TuTh 1:30-2:45 Staff

220. Romantic Literature 3 hours
3HU, WR

An interdisciplinary study of "romanticism" in England and Scotland between 1789 and 1832, treating works by poets, essay writers, novelists, painters and urban architects. Among works to be considered will be poems by Blake, Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley and Byron, essays by Burke, De Quincey, Coleridge and Hazlitt, and fiction by Mary Shelley and Mary Wollstonecraft. Painters to be considered will include Girtin, Constable, Turner and B. R. Haydon (some of whose letters and journals we will also read). We will investigate the Prince Regent's attempts, working with John Nash and others, to transform London into an imperial city. P, WL. Prerequisite: See headnote above. Enrollment Limit: 30.

Sem 2 ENGL-220-01 TuTh 1:30-2:45 Mr. Olmsted

ENGL-220-02 TuTh 3:00-4:15 Mr. Olmsted

228. Modern British and Irish Fiction 4 hours
4HU, WR

Novels and short fiction by such major twentieth-century writers as Conrad, Ford, Lawrence, Mansfield, Forster, Joyce, Woolf, and Greene. F, WL. Prerequisite: See headnote above. Enrollment Limit: 30.

Sem 1 ENGL-228-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Mr. Walker

230. Reading and Writing Poetry 3 hours
3HU, WR

In this course we'll use poetry-writing to sharpen your critical insight and a close analytical reading of collections by Yeats, Plath, and Merwin to develop and extend your own poetic skills. Additional readings on poetic theory and the creative process. Written work will be two critical essays and a portfolio of poems. (No previous poetry-writing experience necessary.) P. Prerequisite: See headnote above. Enrollment Limit: 35.

Sem 2 ENGL-230-01 TuTh 9:35-10:50 Mr. Hobbs

239. History and Structure of the English Language 3 hours
3HU, WR
The development of English from its Anglo-Saxon beginnings to the present, concentrating on changes in the meanings of words, in grammatical forms, in pronunciation, and in usage. EL. Prerequisite: See headnote above. Enrollment Limit: 30.

Sem 2 ENGL-239-01 MWF 11:00-11:50 Ms. Bryan

255. In Search of America: Early American Writing in the Information Age 3 hours
3HU, WR

A survey of American literature from 1600-1800 and an introduction to research methods assisted by information technology. F, AL. Prerequisite: See headnote above. Enrollment Limit: 30.

Sem 2 ENGL-255-01 TuTh 1:00-2:15 Mr. McMillin


257. The Re-making of "America" and "Americans": American Literature at the Turn into the Twentieth Century 4 hours
4HU, WR
Tension and change marked the nation's racial and ethnic composition, class formations, gender arrangements, laws, and international status. The literature of the era not only reflected this ferment, but participated in debates about what "America" and "Americans" were. At the same time, the nature of "literature" and the circumstances of its production, distribution and reception were also in flux. Reading will include narratives and essays by Howells, James, Jewett, Freeman, Chesnutt, Hopkins, Twain, Garland, Dunbar Nelson, Sui Sin Far, Zitkala Sa and others. F, AL. Prerequisite: See headnote above. Enrollment Limit: 30.
Sem 2 ENGL-257-01 MWF 10:00-10:50 Ms. Zagarell

261. Humor and Twentieth-Century African-American Literature 3 hours
3HU, CD, WR

Introduction to critical consideration of functions and forms of the "funny," ironic, and satirical in literature (through such theorists of the phenomenon as Hobbs, Freud, Bergson, Rourke, Hughes, and others) and in African-American literature in particular. Authors we will read may include Chesnutt, Schuyler, Hurston, Hughes, Ellison, Reed, Bambara, and Gaines. F, AL. Prerequisite: See headnote above. Enrollment Limit: 30.

Sem 1 ENGL-261-01 MWF 3:30-4:20 Ms. Johns

Sem 2 ENGL-261-01 TuTh 9:35-10:50 Ms. Johns

265. Anglophone Literatures of the Third World 3 hours
3HU, WR

Through a variety of theoretical essays and novels, this course will examine the problems of definition, analysis, and evaluation that attend our interpretation of works from the "Third World." We will consider, for instance, whether or not: 1) "Third World" or "Post-colonial" are appropriate designations; 2) notions of "marginality," "difference," "alterity," so often deployed to characterize these works, are useful interpretive tools; 3) the perception that these works are always already enactments of resistance against dominant ideologies and formations is effective. F, WL. Prerequisite: See headnote above. Enrollment Limit: 30.

Sem 2 ENGL-265-01 TuTh 3:00-4:15 Ms. Needham

272. American Cinema: The Possibilities of Art in the Entertainment Business 4 hours
4HU, WR

This course will focus on how American cinema functions as an entertainment industry and the ways in which the demands of business and technology have shaped it. At the same time we will explore American movies as works of art produced in a tradition of strong genres and the star system, and efforts of filmmakers to use these for individualized expression. The course will focus particularly on the two great eras of American cinema, the late 1930s and early 1940s and the 1970s. (Not open to students who have already taken ENGL 373.) F, AL. Prerequisite: See headnote above. Enrollment Limit: 30.

Sem 2 ENGL-272-01 MWF 10:00-10:50 Mr. Day

282. Survey of Drama 3 hours
3HU, WR

This course will study the development of drama from the ancient Greeks to the present with the aim of promoting understanding and analysis of dramatic texts. By studying the major forms of drama--tragedy, comedy, tragicomedy--within their historical and cultural contexts, we will explore the elements common to all dramatic works, as well as the way in which those elements vary and evolve from one time and place to another. D, WL. Prerequisite: See headnote above. Enrollment Limit: 30.

Sem 2 ENGL-282-01 MWF 11:00-11:50 Ms. Geis

ENGL-282-02 MWF 1:30-2:20 Ms. Geis

283. Modern Irish Drama 3 hours
3HU, WR

A survey beginning with the founding of the Abbey Theatre by W. B. Yeats and Lady Gregory in 1901, and continuing with later Irish plays by John Synge, Sean O'Casey, Samuel Beckett, and Brendan Behan, as well as recent works by Brian Friel, Tom Murphy, Sebastian Barry, and Marina Carr. D, WL. Prerequisite: See headnote above. Enrollment Limit: 30.
Sem 1 ENGL-283-01 MWF 11:00-11:50 Mr. Hobbs

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 300-Level Courses

Courses at the 300 level are designed to broaden students' experience of literature in English while also deepening the study of the discipline through focused reading of texts, criticism, literary history and theory.
Prerequisites: These courses are open to students who have completed at least 3 courses at the new 200 level, or (for students who have taken courses prior to 1998) at least 3 courses in English at the 150 level or above, or by consent of the instructor.

302. Studies in Medieval Literature 3 hours
3HU, WR

A selection of medieval authors drawn both from the Middle English writers and from those in other languages. F, EL. Prerequisite: Three 200-level courses (see headnote above). Enrollment Limit: 25.

Sem 2 ENGL-302-01 MWF 2:30-3:20 Ms. Bryan

304. Shakespeare and the Forms of Tragedy 3 hours
3HU, WR

Shakespeare repeatedly took up the form of tragedy during his career. This course will explore the varied potentialities of tragedy, including the different traditions available to him, and we will consider what theoretical approaches to tragedy shed light on his different approaches to the genre in the dozen or so tragedies. D, EL. Prerequisite: Three 200-level courses (see headnote above). Enrollment Limit: 25.

Sem 2 ENGL-304-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Mr. Pierce

315. Eighteenth-Century Fiction 4 hours
4HU, WR

The emergence of prose fiction in the eighteenth century, focusing on novelistic form, with attention to cultural and historical contexts. Authors may include Behn, Defoe, Haywood, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Goldsmith, Lewis, Austen. F, EL. Prerequisite: Three 200-level courses (see headnote above). Enrollment Limit: 25.

Sem 1 ENGL-315-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Ms. Motooka

317. Nineteenth-Century Novel 4 hours
4HU, WR

A survey of fiction written in nineteenth-century Britain, with special attention being paid to historical and cultural context, serial publication and changing readerships, the emergence of a sophisticated aesthetic of fiction in critical periodicals, and the interplay between text and visual image in illustrated fiction. Works will include fiction by Austen, Dickens, Thackeray, Gaskell, Emily Brontë, Charlotte Brontë, Trollope, and George Eliot. F, WL. Prerequisite: Three 200-level courses (see headnote above). Enrollment Limit: 25.

Sem 1 ENGL-317-01 TuTh 3:00-4:15 Mr. Olmsted

327. Modern Drama: Ibsen to Pirandello 3 hours
3HU, WR

This course explores the different ways in which "reality" was staged by playwrights including Ibsen, Chekhov, Strindberg, Shaw, and Pirandello. We will consider how modern theatrical movements such as realism, naturalism, expressionism, and metadrama sought to represent "reality," focusing on evolving stagecraft. Emphasis will also be placed on the historical and cultural contexts surrounding the early stages of modern drama. D, WL. Prerequisite: Three 200-level courses (see headnote above). Enrollment Limit: 25.

Sem 2 ENGL-327-01 Tu 7:00-9:30 pm Ms. Tufts

332. Modern Poetry II: Imagism to Postmodernism 3 hours
3HU, WR

Modern poetry between 1917 and 1945, including such developments as the reaction to imagism, expressionism, surrealism, and objectivism, and such major figures as Pound, Eliot, Stevens, Williams, and Moore. P, WL. Prerequisite: Three 200-level courses (see headnote above). Enrollment Limit: 25.

Sem 1 ENGL-332-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Mr. Hobbs

336. Shakespeare and His Contemporaries 3 hours
3HU, WR

D, EL
. Prerequisite: Three 200-level courses (see headnote above). Enrollment Limit: 25.

Sem 2 ENGL-336-01 MWF 3:30-4:20 Staff

349. Contemporary British and Irish Drama 3 hours
3HU, WR

This course focuses on major playwrights of England and Ireland from post-World War II to the present. Some of the areas of attention will be: the "angry young men"; metadrama; gender, race, and ethnicity; responses to Thatcherism; and the "new brutalism." Playwrights might include: Beckett, Osborne, Bond, Stoppard, Hare, Pinter, Griffiths, Brenton, Poliakoff, Churchill, Friel, McDonagh, Kureishi, Carr, Reid, and Kane. Students will be expected to attend productions and participate in scene enactments. D, WL. Prerequisite: Three 200-level courses (see headnote above). Enrollment Limit: 25.

Sem 1 ENGL-349-01 TuTh 1:30-2:45 Ms. Geis

353. American Literature: 1825-1865 4 hours
4HU, WR

An exploration of work by Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Jacobs, Stoddard, Douglass, Whitman, and Dickinson. F, AL. Prerequisite: Three 200-level courses (see headnote above). Enrollment Limit: 25.

Sem 2 ENGL-353-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Ms. Zagarell

360. Representing Blackness, Whiteness, and Citizenship in American Fiction 4 hours
4HU, CD, WR

This course centers on readings of select novels and short fiction by black and white American authors highlighting or masking the presence of racial tenets and/or anxieties in imaginative contemplations of the national identity and citizenship during key transitional moments: loosely, the 1850s, 1890s, 1920s, and (possibly) 1960s. F, AL. Prerequisite: Three 200-level courses (see headnote above). Enrollment Limit: 25.

Sem 2 ENGL-360-01 TuTh 1:30-2:45 Ms. Johns

365. American Drama 3 hours
3HU, WR

Selected works of major American playwrights. Emphasis will be placed on close reading, as well as on the significance of each play in regard to political and social movements of the time and the evolution of the American theater. Among the playwrights to be considered: Odets, O'Neill, Williams, Hellman, Albee, Shepard, Baraka, Bullins, Fornes, and Kushner. D, AL. Prerequisite: Three 200-level courses (see headnote above). Enrollment Limit: 25.

Sem 2 ENGL-365-01 MW 12:00-1:15 Ms. Tufts

366. Nature & Transcendentalism 4 hours
4HU, WR

An examination of the writings of the American Transcendentalists of the 19th century with special attention to Emerson, Thoreau, and the concept of nature. We will study some of the early contributors to this school of thought, as well as more recent expositors. Students should be prepared to tackle difficult texts that pose challenging philosophical, political, and interpretive questions. AL. Prerequisite: Three 200-level courses (see headnote above). Enrollment Limit: 25.

Sem 1 ENGL-366-01 TuTh 1:00-2:15 Mr. McMillin

372. Contemporary Literary Theory in American Culture 4 hours
4HU, WR

This course is about developments in literary theory in the last thirty years not as abstract systems but in the larger context of American intellectual and artistic culture. Our concern will be understanding literary theories in their historical and institutional contexts as well as considering their value as ways of thinking. We'll pay particular attention to the impact of post-structuralism on American critics, the relation of literary criticism to culture criticism, and the elaboration of the idea of post-modernity. AL. Prerequisite: Three 200-level courses (see headnote above). Enrollment Limit: 25.

Sem 1 ENGL-372-01 MWF 11:00-11:50 Mr. Day

376. Screening Spirituality 4 hours
4HU, WR

Since its inception, cinema has maintained a perennial concern with problems of representing experiences of the miraculous or transcendental. Despite the customary linkage of film to secular modernization, then, filmmakers and critics have returned repeatedly to the form's profound evocation of a sense of reality to explore the limits and consequences of this tendency. Across historical and national divisions, we will investigate cinematic treatments of spirituality in light of the challenges they present to critical theory and practice. F, AL. Prerequisite: Three 200-level courses (see headnote above) or consent of instructor. Enrollment Limit: 25.

Sem 2 ENGL-376-01 TuTh 3:00-4:15 Mr. Pence

Tu 7:00-9:30 pm

386. Narrating the Nation: Historical and Literary Approaches to Nationalism 4 hours
2HU, 2SS, CD, WR

This course offers an analysis of the narratives through which nationalisms acquire credibility and authority. This discussion-centered class will examine the nationalisms of Latin America, the Caribbean, and South Asia with particular reference to those of Argentina, Mexico, Chile, Haiti, and India. Narrative theories as deployed in and by the disciplines of history and English literary studies provide the overarching critical methodologies for interdisciplinary analysis. F, WL. Identical to HIST 367. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 25.
Sem 1 ENGL-386-01 MW 12:00-1:15 Ms. Needham, Mr. Volk

391. Selected Authors: George Eliot and Virginia Woolf 4 hours
4HU, WR

The course will use historical, stylistic, and feminist perspectives to explore the content and development of works by these two eminent British women writers. Texts to be read: Eliot's The Mill on the Floss and Middlemarch or Daniel Deronda; Woolf's A Room of One's Own, Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse and The Waves. Supplementary reading will include one or two essays by each writer and some recent criticism. F, WL. Prerequisite: Three 200-level English courses (see headnote above). Enrollment Limit: 25.

Sem 1 ENGL-391-01 MWF 2:30-3:20 Ms. Linehan

393. Selected Authors: James Joyce 4 hours
4HU, WR

The development of Joyce's fiction from Dubliners to Finnegans Wake, emphasizing Ulysses, in the contexts of biography and post-colonial Irish culture and history. F, WL. Prerequisite: Three 200-level English courses (see headnote above). Enrollment Limit: 25.

Sem 2 ENGL-393-01 TuTh 3:00-4:15 Mr. Hobbs

395. Poetry Workshop 3 hours
3HU, WR

Identical to CRWR 310.

Sem 1 ENGL-395-01 W 7:15-10:00 p.m. Ms. Collins

Sem 2 ENGL-395-01 T 7:15-10:00 p.m. Ms. Alexander

396. Non-Fiction Workshop 4 hours
4HU, WR

Identical to CRWR 340.

Sem 1 ENGL-396-01 Th 7:00-10:00 p.m. Mr. Chaon

Sem 2 ENGL-396-01 Th 7:00-10:00 p.m. Staff

397. Fiction Workshop 4 hours
4HU, WR

Identical to CRWR 320.

Sem 1 ENGL-397-01 Th 7:00-10:00 p.m. Staff

Sem 2 ENGL-397-01 Th 7:00-10:00 p.m. Mr. Chaon

398. Playwriting 4 hours
4HU, WR

Identical to CRWR 330.

Sem 2 ENGL-398-01 TuTh 3:00-4:15 Mr. Walker

399. Teaching and Tutoring Writing Across the Disciplines 3 hours
3HU, WRi

Identical to RHET 481.
Sem 1 ENGL-399-01 TuTh 3:00-4:15 Mr. Podis
Sem 2 ENGL-399-01 TuTh 3:00-4:15 Mr. Podis

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400-Level Courses

These courses are designed primarily for seniors and offer opportunities to do individual work based on focused reading of texts, criticism, literary history, or theory, with the goal of engaging in extended research, writing, or performance projects. Courses at the 400 level are open by application only in the semester preceding the course. Students enrolling in 400-level courses should normally have completed at least two courses at the 300 level.


400. Seminar: Literary Sympathies and Social Consciousness 3 hours

3HU, WR

What authorizes literary representation to stand in for social reality and moral truth? Beginning with the eighteenth-century "cult of feeling," this course will investigate the theoretical and cultural assumptions that have enabled, and continue to enable, literature to function as political activism. EL. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 15.

Sem 2 ENGL-400-01 W 7:00-9:30 p.m. Ms. Motooka

405. Seminar: Philosophical Issues in Shakespeare 4 hours
4HU, WR

The course will examine two kinds of issues. First, we will look at ways in which the plays make use of philosophical concerns, in particular drawing on classical and later traditions of skepticism, cynicism, and stoicism. Second, we will consider ethical and epistemological issues of interpreting the plays. Some previous study of Shakespeare or philosophy helpful. D, EL. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 15.

Sem 2 ENGL-405-01 MWF 3:30-4:20 Mr. Pierce

406. Seminar: Post-Colonial Criticism: Theory & Practice 4 hours
4HU, WR

In this seminar we will read essays by a variety of post-colonial critics from and/or writing about the Third World. We will focus not only on the subjects of their analysis, but also on the rhetoric of their arguments--how they say what they say, to what ends, etc.--as too we will consider how they locate themselves (explicitly or implicitly) vis-a-vis their subjects and what are the bases for their authority. WL. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 15.

Sem 2 ENGL-406-01 Tu 7:00-9:30 p.m. Ms. Needham

433. Special Topic: Imagining History 4 hours
4HU, WR

This course will explore the ways history is defined and represented in film. The emphasis will be primarily, but not exclusively, on American cinema. We will be equally concerned with what films do with history and what focusing on subject of history reveals about film as art. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 18.

Sem 2 ENGL-433-01 WF 11:00-12:15 Mr. Day

434. Seminar: Africana Literary Theory and Theorizing 3 hours
3HU, CD, WR

Drawing on recent critical interest in studying black literary traditions across national boundaries, this seminar will examine the emergence, evolution, and continuing development of major theories and methods for interpreting literatures of Africa and the African diaspora. We will focus on key questions revolving around the functions and characteristics of literature, cultural nationalism and identity, and feminism in literary movements such as the Harlem Renaissance and Negritude, the Black Arts Movement, and Creolite. We will read major theorists such as Locke, Cesaire, Baraka, Ngugi, and Boyce Davies as well as some creative works. F, AL. Identical to AAST 334. Prerequisite: At least one 300-level course in African and/or African-American literature. Consent of instructors required. Enrollment Limit: 15.

Sem 2 ENGL-434-01 W 7:00-10:00 p.m. Ms. Johns and Ms. Gadsby

435. Seminar: Nature Writing in America 4 hours
4HU, WR

This course involves an investigation of the problematic that arises from the interaction between the terms of the course title: what happens when nature, writing, and American come together? We will work our way through philosophical and historical studies of American nature writing; we will study representative texts; but we will also cultivate our own ability to understand and write about nature. F, AL. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 15.

Sem 2 ENGL-435-01 MW 1:00-2:30 Mr. McMillin

449. Senior Project 3-4 hours
3-4HU, WR

The senior project is an opportunity to engage, on an individual basis under the supervision of a faculty member in the Department of English, in a semester-long research project. This project typically culminates in a 15-20 page essay and an oral presentation of that work at the end of the semester. This opportunity is available to a limited number of senior English majors, by application only. The senior project differs from the Honors program in being limited to one semester; it does not qualify the student to become a candidate for Honors at graduation. Prerequisite:
Admission to the senior project. Consent of instructor required.

Sem 2 ENGL-449-01 To be arranged Staff

453. Honors Project 1-3 hours
1-3HU, WR

Intensive work on a topic of the student's honors project, to be organized in consultation with the instructor. Consent of instructor required.

Sem 1 ENGL-453-01 To be arranged Staff

454. Honors Colloquium 2 hours
2HU

A forum for group discussion of honors projects at various stages of design and composition and for engaging with some critical theory. The first and last weeks will address the honors project as an intellectual exploration, an analytic enterprise, and a rhetorical entity. During the middle half of the semester we will examine methods and theories pertinent to the study of literature and culture. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program. Note: CR/NE grading. Consent of instructor required.

Sem 1 ENGL-454-01 Th 7:30-9:30 p.m. Mr. Walker

455. Honors Project 1-4 hours
1-4HU, WR

Intensive work on the student's honors project, culminating in either an honors paper or creative project. Consent of instructor required.

Sem 2 ENGL-455-01 To be arranged Staff

995. Private Reading 1-3 hours
1-3HU

Consent of instructor required.

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London Semester

One semester each year an English department faculty member teaches courses in the Danenberg Oberlin-in-London Program. For a fuller description of the London Program in general and next year's courses see the London Program section of this catalog.


900. The Danenberg Lectures on British Culture and Society 2 hours
2 EX

For full course description see section entitled "London Program."

Sem 1 LOND-900-01 To be arranged Mr. Pence & Ms. Kruks

924. Culture and Politics in Modern Britain 6 hours
3HU/3SS, WR

For full course description see section entitled "London Program." F, WL.

Sem 1 ENGL-924-01 To be arranged Mr. Pence & Ms. Kruks

925. British Theater 6 hours
6HU, WR
For full course description see section entitled "London Program." D, EL/WL.

Sem 1 ENGL-925-01 To be arranged Mr. Pence

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