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East Asian Studies

The East Asian Studies Program is an interdisciplinary program with a focus on the region that includes China, Japan, and Korea. The main purposes of the program are to provide extensive training in East Asian languages as well as to introduce students to the regional societies, cultures, and histories through course work in the discipline of anthropology, art history, ethnomusicology, history, literature, politics and religion. Since language work is an integral part of all major programs in East Asian Studies, interested students are strongly advised to begin language work in their first or second year at Oberlin. This is especially true of students who hope to spend time studying abroad.

Major. This interdisciplinary major program combines course work in disciplines with language study. Students may choose a program which
1. gives emphasis broadly to East Asian regional studies or

2. emphasizes either China or Japan (Chinese or Japanese Studies) or

3. is focused in a discipline (e. g. History, Religion) or

4. concentrates on Chinese or Japanese language and literature. Students who choose option 4 must complete two semesters of 400-level language courses.

Korean Studies option: This concentration may be completed through course work at Oberlin and study abroad at an approved institution.

The requirements of the major with any of the above concentrations include:

1. four semesters of Chinese or Japanese language, with at least one year of language study done at Oberlin College. In the case of Korean language, the equivalent of four semesters taken at an approved institution will also meet this requirement.

2. six semester-long courses (minimum of 18 hours), including at least one seminar. No more than two upper-level language courses may count toward this requirement. All majors must take courses devoted to two or more of the three East Asian countries, China, Japan, and Korea, at least two of which must treat subjects outside the main country of interest.

3. a capstone project:
The capstone project is meant to provide an opportunity for the student to bring to bear the broad elements of his or her training in East Asian Studies in a focused intellectual project. The capstone project will normally be designated in consultation with the faculty advisor no later than the beginning of the third semester before the student's expected graduation. The project must be completed in a scheduled course taught by an EAS faculty member or in a Winter Term project overseen by an EAS faculty member. The capstone project may include, for instance, research papers completed in seminars or colloquia taught by Program faculty with permission of the faculty member involved. Alternatively, students may elect to devote a Winter Term to revising a paper to comply with the capstone requirement or, with approval of the advisor, creating a capstone project. Further information on the capstone can be found at http://www.oberlin.edu/eas.
Students planning to study abroad should complete the capstone in residence at Oberlin. Successful completion of Honors fulfills the capstone project requirement.

Students who enter the program with previous language training are still required to take a minimum of 24 hours to complete the major, even if they place out of first- and second-year language classes. Students proficient in Chinese, Japanese or Korean language must study another East Asian language to fulfill the requirements of the major.

Minor. The minor consists of a minimum of 15 credit hours of course work. No more than 6 of the 15 hours can be from basic language courses (100- and 200-level), and a minimum of 6 hours must be in non-language work. Students interested in a minor should consult with an EAS faculty member and/or the director in order to assure that the minor program is coherent.

Placement Tests.

Chinese: Consult with a Chinese faculty member regarding placement.

Japanese: All incoming students who have acquired linguistic ability in Japanese elsewhere, or who wish to qualify for advanced courses, should take the Placement Test administered during Orientation to determine the level at which Japanese study should be continued.

Study in China. The East Asian Studies Program offers the opportunity for study in China under the auspices of the Associated Colleges in China (ACC) Program. This program, based at the Capital University of Economics and Business at Beijing, offers intensive instruction in the Chinese language. Students may participate for a summer, one or two semesters, or for a full twelve months. Students are required to have completed a full year of Chinese to participate in this program. More detailed information and applications for the program are available from the Chinese studies faculty.

Study in Japan. The East Asian Studies Program offers the opportunity for study in Japan under the auspices of the following two programs. Students on financial aid should consult the Study Away Office before planning to participate in either of these programs.

1. Associated Kyoto Program. This program, which offers the student a year abroad amidst the academic and cultural attractions of Japan's ancient imperial capital, is based at Doshisha University, one of Japan's leading private universities. Students can earn up to 30 hours of credit which are subject to the Transfer of Credit fee. Prerequisites for admission include one full year of Japanese, EAST 131, a 3.00 GPA, a B average in Japanese, and an interview.

2. GLCA-ACM Japan Study Program. This program is based at Waseda University in Tokyo, one of Japan's leading private universities, and includes language study and independent research. Students admitted to this program can earn up to 30 hours of credit. The Transfer of Credit fee is also applicable to this program. A minimum GPA of 3.0 and one semester of Japanese are required for admission.

Transfer of Credit. The transfer of credit is not automatic. Students wishing to apply transfer credit to the major should be advised that a minimum of 18 hours must be completed at Oberlin, including at least one year of language study and the capstone project. For the minor, no less than half of the course work, including 3 hours in non-language course work, must be completed at Oberlin

Honors. Admission to the Honors Program will be by invitation of the EAS faculty at the end of the second semester of the junior year. Students interested in being considered for Honors are encouraged to indicate their interest and discuss the details of the program with any member of the East Asian Studies faculty by early in their junior year. By May 1 of the junior year, the candidate will submit a tentative written proposal and bibliography. Students admitted to Honors will present a progress report at mid-year to the faculty. The final written project will be submitted in May of the senior year, when the senior oral examination will be scheduled, both the thesis and the oral examination will figure in the awarding of honors.

Newton Prize. The annual Newton Prize competition is open to all students in the College. Monetary prizes are awarded for the best essays, research papers, translations, etc., on Asian themes that promote better understanding between East and West. Works submitted are evaluated by the EAS faculty. Deadline for submission of entries is late March.

Asia House. Asia House is the program dormitory for students who demonstrate an interest in Asia. In an atmosphere of co-ed living, student-oriented programs about Asia are sponsored annually, including formal lectures, workshops, political discussions, films, performances, Asian cooking, martial arts, calligraphy, concerts, exhibits and entertainment of all kinds. Students play a major role in planning and coordinating these events. Chinese and Japanese language assistants live in Asia House or nearby. Chinese and Japanese language tables meet several times a week at the associated Stevenson Dining Hall.

Winter Term. The following faculty are willing to sponsor Winter Term projects as indicated. Ms. Davis: Asian Art. Mr. Dicenzo: Japanese history, modern Japanese literature, travel in Japan. Ms. Gay: Japanese language and literature. Mr. Kelley: Chinese history. Mr. Li: Chinese language. Ms. Ma: Chinese language and literature. Ms. Sherif: Japanese language and literature.

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Chinese Language and Literature Courses

101. Beginning Chinese I 5 hours
5HU, CD
First-year Chinese. Pronunciation and grammar of modern standard Chinese and an introduction to the writing system. Within the first year of study, students will be introduced to approximately 500 characters and the reading of simple texts in the vernacular style. Enrollment Limit: 20.

Sem 1 CHIN-101-01 MTuWThF 10:00-10:50 Ms. Ma , Staff

CHIN-101-02 MTuWThF 11:00-11:50 Ms. Ma, Staff

102. Beginning Chinese II 5 hours
5HU, CD

First-year Chinese. Continuation of CHIN 101. Prerequisites: CHIN 101 or consent of instructor. Enrollment Limit: 20.

Sem 2 CHIN-102-01 MTuWThF 10:00-10:50 Ms. Ma, Staff

CHIN-102-02 MTuWThF 11:00-11:50 Ms. Ma, Staff


106. Chinese Fiction in Translation 3 hours
3HU, CD

See supplement for topic and description.

Sem 1 CHIN-106-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Staff

108. Chinese Poetry in Translation 3 hours
3HU, CD

Next offered 2002-03

109. Topics in Chinese Film 3 hours
3HU, CD

This course is a survey of important Chinese films made after the Cultural Revolution, with a special emphasis on the critically acclaimed "Fifth Generation" filmmakers, such as Zhang Yimou, Chen Kaige, and Huang Jianxin. The course pays particular attention to how the political, social, and cultural upheavals of twentieth-century China both shape and constitute a central theme in contemporary Chinese cinema. Enrollment Limit: 50.

Sem 2 CHIN-109-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Staff

120. Chinese Calligraphy 2 hours
2HU, CD

This course is an introduction to Chinese calligraphy, focusing on the mastery of the standard script kaishu. It will also cover the historical development and aesthetics of Chinese calligraphy. Prerequisites: Some knowledge of Chinese characters. Consent of instructor required. Enrollment Limit: 15.

Sem 1 CHIN-120-01 W 7:00-9:00 p.m. Mr. Li

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Chinese: Intermediate and Advanced Courses

201. Intermediate Chinese I 5 hours
5HU, CD

Second-year Chinese. Development of skills in the vernacular language through oral recitation and reading of texts, with drills on special features of grammar and emphasis on vocabulary in the vernacular idiom. Students will be introduced to approximately 600 additional characters. Prerequisites: CHIN 102 or consent of instructor.

Sem 1 CHIN-201-01 MTuWThF 11:00-11:50 Ms. Liu, Staff

202. Intermediate Chinese II 5 hours
5HU, CD

Second-year Chinese. Continuation of CHIN 201. Prerequisites: CHIN 201 or consent of instructor.

Sem 2 CHIN-202-01 MTuWThF 11:00-11:50 Ms. Liu, Staff

301. Advanced Chinese I 3 hours
3HU, CD

Third-year Chinese. This course aims to develop skills in reading, aural comprehension, speech, and writing. Vocabulary expansion and control of grammatical patterns are emphasized. Materials to be used include movies and screenplays, newspapers, and readings in expository prose. Conducted in Chinese. Prerequisites: CHIN 202 or consent of instructor.

Sem 1 CHIN-301-01 MWF 3:30-4:20 Mr. Li

302. Advanced Chinese II 3 hours
3HU, CD

Third-year Chinese. The Chinese language skills learned in CHIN 301 will be developed in this course through readings in literature and culture. Conducted in Chinese. Prerequisites: CHIN 30l or consent of instructor.

Sem 2 CHIN-302-01 MWF 3:30-4:20 Mr. Li

305. Introduction to Literary Chinese 3 hours
3HU, CD

An introduction to literary Chinese through readings selected from basic classical sources in philosophy, history, and literature. Consent of instructor required.

Sem 2 CHIN-305-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Mr. Li

401. Seminar in Chinese Literature 3 hours
3HU, CD

Fourth-year Chinese. Readings from contemporary Chinese literature, discussions, and writing assignments will further develop advanced skills in Chinese. Conducted in Chinese. Prerequisites: CHIN 302 or consent of instructor.

Sem 1 CHIN-401-01 Tu 6:30-8:00 p.m. Ms. Ma

Plus one hour to be arranged

402. Readings in Society, History and Contemporary Events 3 hours
3HU, CD

Fourth-year Chinese. Advanced skills in reading, writing, speaking, and aural comprehension will be developed in this course through readings in expository prose, discussions, and writing assignments. Conducted in Chinese. Prerequisites: CHIN 401 or consent of instructor.

Sem 2 CHIN-402-01 Tu 6:30-8:00 p.m. Ms. Ma

Plus one hour to be arranged

500. Capstone Project 0.5 hours
0.5HU

CR/NE grading only. Consent: Consent of instructor required.

995. Private Reading 1-3 hours
1-3HU, CD

Independent study of a Chinese subject beyond the range of catalog course offerings. Consent of instructor required. Private Readings sponsored by Mr. Li, Ms. Liu and Ms. Ma.

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Japanese Language and Literature Courses

101. Elementary Japanese I 5 hours
5HU, CD

First-year Japanese. An introduction to basic grammar, sentence patterns, and vocabulary of the modern language. Attention to the written component of modern Japanese will include the hiragana and katakana syllabaries. This course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of Japanese. No auditors. See instructor for correct placement. Enrollment Limit: 20.

Sem 1 JAPN-101-01 MTuWThF 10:00-10:50 Staff

JAPN-101-02 MTuWThF 11:00-11:50 Staff

102. Elementary Japanese II 5 hours
5HU, CD

First-year Japanese. Continuation of JAPN 101. Attention to the written component of modern Japanese will include 175 kanji. Prerequisites: JAPN 101 or consent of instructor. Enrollment Limit: 20.

Sem 2 JAPN-102-01 MTuWThF 10:00-10:50 Ms. Gay, Staff

JAPN-102-02 MTuWThF 11:00-11:50 Ms. Gay, Staff

116. Traditional Japanese Literature in Translation 3 hours
3HU, CD, WR

This course explores the major genres of Japanese literature including myths, poetry, tales, diaries, drama, etc. The approach is chronological from earliest times to the mid-nineteenth century, placing the literature in the historical and social context of each age -- ancient, medieval, and early modern. Course format is lecture and discussion based on readings and films. No prior knowledge of Japanese language or history is required. Enrollment Limit: 35.

Sem 1 JAPN-116-01 TuTh 1:30-2:45 Ms. Gay

118. Modern Japanese Literature in Translation 3 hours
3HU, CD, WP

An examination of significant Japanese literary texts and cultural trends of the Meji Period (1868-1912) to the 1990s. We will do close readings of prose fiction, poetry, and film, and study the changing reception of these works in relation to notions of gender, aesthetics, ethnicity, and nationalism. No knowledge of Japanese language is required.

Sem 2 JAPN-118-01 TuTh 1:30-2:45 Ms. Sherif

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Japanese: Intermediate and Advanced Courses

201. Intermediate Japanese I 5 hours
5HU, CD

Second-year Japanese. Primary emphasis on the development of oral skills and secondary emphasis on reading skills. Students will continue to learn basic grammatical patterns, expand vocabulary, and improve communicative skills in modern Japanese through oral-aural drills and exercises. An additional 200 kanji will be introduced. Prerequisites: JAPN l02 or consent of instructor. Enrollment Limit: 20.

Sem 1 JAPN-201-01 MTuWThF 10:00-10:50 Ms. Sherif, Staff

202. Intermediate Japanese II 5 hours
5HU, CD

Second-year Japanese. Continuation of JAPN 201. An additional l75 kanji will be introduced. Prerequisites: JAPN 20l or consent of instructor. Enrollment Limit: 20.

Sem 2 JAPN-202-01 MTuWThF 10:00-10:50 Staff

301. Japanese Reading and Conversation I 3 hours
3HU, CD

Third-year Japanese. This course seeks to reinforce the vocabulary and grammatical patterns learned in the first two years and to improve speaking and reading skills through task-oriented conversational practices, reading practices, and group discussion. Conducted in Japanese. Prerequisites: JAPN 202. Consent of instructor required.

Sem 1 JAPN-301-01 TuTh 3:00-4:15 Ms. Sherif

302. Japanese Reading and Conversation II 3 hours
3HU, CD

Third-year Japanese. Continuation of JAPN 301. Prerequisites: JAPN 301 or consent of instructor required.

Sem 2 JAPN-302-01 TuTh 1:30-2:45 Ms. Sherif

310. Love, War, and Gender in Japanese Literature 3 hours
3HU, CD, WR

Next offered 2002-2003.

320. The Avant-Garde in Japanese Literature 3 hours
3HU, CD, WRI

In this course, we will study the notion of the avant-garde in Japanese culture, and in particular in the literature and film of the Meiji Period (1868-1912) to the present. What was considered aesthetic and ideological innovation in cultural production in times of radical change, such as the Meiji period and the post-defeat era, and in times of relative stability? We will also examine the role of avant-garde art and political activism in elite and mass culture, and in nation building. Texts and films that may be included: Oe Kenzaburo, Tanizaki Jun'ichiro, Tawada Yoko, Abe Kobo, Hayashi Fumiko, Suzuki Seijun, Shinoda Masahiro, as well as Buto avant-garde dance. No knowledge of Japanese language is required. Students who are able are encouraged to do readings in Japanese. Prerequisites: JAPN116 or JAPN118 or HIST131 or HIST 132. Enrollment Limit: 15.

Sem 1 JAPN-320-01 Th 7:00-9:00 p.m. Ms. Sherif

401. Advanced Japanese I 3 hours
3HU, CD

Fourth-year Japanese. This course is intended primarily for students who have completed a period of study in Japan. It seeks to further improve speaking, reading, and writing skills through the use of authentic reading materials, group discussion, and writing exercises. Readings are taken from modern literary works. Conducted in Japanese. Consent of instructor required.

Sem 1 JAPN-401-01 Tu 7:00-8:30 p.m. Ms. Gay

Plus 1 hour to be arranged

402. Advanced Japanese II 3 hours
3HU, CD

Fourth-year Japanese. This course is intended primarily for students who have completed a period of study in Japan. It seeks to further improve speaking, reading, and writing skills through the use of authentic reading materials, group discussion, and writing exercises. Readings are taken from newspapers and magazines. Conducted in Japanese. Consent of instructor required.

Sem 2 JAPN-402-01 Tu 7:00-8:30 p.m. Staff

Plus 1 hour to be arranged

500. Capstone Project 0.5 hours
0.5HU

CR/NE grading only. Consent: Consent of instructor required.

995. Private Reading 1-3 hours
1-3HU, CD

Independent study of a Japanese subject beyond the range of catalog course offerings. Consent of instructor required. Private readings sponsored by Ms. Gay, Ms. Sherif and Ms. Tsuda.

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East Asian Studies Courses

121. Chinese Civilization 3-4 hours
3-4SS, CD, WR

Identical to HIST 105.

Sem 1 EAST-121-01 MWF 10:00-10:50 Mr. Kelley

122. Modern China 3-4 hours
3-4SS, CD, WR

Identical to HIST 106.

Sem 2 EAST-122-01 MWF 11:00-11:50 Mr. Kelley

131. Traditional Japan to 1868 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR

Identical to HIST-159.

Sem 1 EAST-131-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Mr. Di Cenzo

132. Modern Japan, 1868 to Present 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR
Identical to HIST 160.

Sem 2 EAST-132-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Mr. Di Cenzo


141. Approaches to Chinese Art History 3 hours
3HU, CD
Identical to ARTS 104.
Sem 1 EAST-141-01 MW 12:00-1:15 Ms. Davis

142. Approaches to Japanese Art History 3 hours
3HU, CD
Identical to ARTS 108.
Sem 1 EAST-141-01 MW 12:00-1:15 Ms. Davis

151. Chinese Thought and Religion 3 hours
3HU, CD
Identical to RELG 235.
Sem 2 EAST-151-01 MWF 9:00-9:50 Staff

152. Japanese Thought and Religion 3 hours
3HU, CD
Identical to RELG 236.
Sem 1 EAST-152-01 MWF 9:00-9:50 Mr. Stockdale

162. Modern Korean History 3 hours
3SS, CD
This survey course will examine the major events, issues and personalities in Korea's modern history from the late nineteenth century to the present. Combining the methods and approaches associated with the discipline of history and historical anthropology, the aim of this course is to provide students with a broad knowledge of Korea's modern history in the context of East Asian development and modernization. Enrollment Limit: 35.
Sem 1 EAST-162-01 MWF 12:00-12:50 Ms. Jager

241. Living with the Bomb 3 hours
3SS, CD, WR
Next offered 2002-03

261. Gendered Modernities in East Asia 3 hours
3SS, CD

This course is designed to examine the relationship between nationalism and gender in Korea, China and Japan. The aim of the course is to explore how the emergence of the nation that was linked to the rise of the modern capitalist system transformed the ways in which Japanese, Korean, and Chinese perceived themselves as gendered beings. By conceptualizing gender in terms of the reciprocally constituted and historically variable of Man and Woman, this course will examine how gender systems are reciprocally related, in multiple and shifting ways, to other modes of modern cultural, political, aesthetic organization and experience. Enrollment Limit: 15.

Sem2 EAST-261-01 TTh 11:00-12:15 Ms. Jager

360. War and Nation Building in East Asia, 1878-1979 3 hours
3SS, CD

This course will examine the relationship between militarism and nationalism in East Asia, focusing particularly on the question of how war--and the discourse about war--has shaped modern Chinese, Korean and Japanese identities. Although warfare in East Asia has been an intimate part of the history of the region, few studies have actually attempted to connect war with state-building, social and cultural values, gender issues and ethics in the context of their emerging identities as modern nations. What historical relationship, if any, did the building of a modern military have with the creation of a modern consciousness about nationhood? How did war--or the threat of war--mold identities and forge alliances to create a national consciousness? How did public commemorations of war, and the memory of it in public rituals, literature and media, shape identities? Enrollment Limit: 15.

Sem2 EAST-360-01 TTh 3:00-4:15 Ms. Jager

401. Honors Program 3 hours
3HU

Admission to the Honors program is subject to the approval of the East Asian Studies faculty during the student's junior year. Registration limited to seniors. Consent of chair required.

500. Capstone Project 0.5 hours
0.5HU

CR/NE grading only. Consent: Consent of instructor required.

995. Private Reading 1-3 hours
1-3HU, CD

Independent study of an East Asian Studies subject beyond the range of catalog course offerings. Consent of instructor required. Private readings sponsored by Ms. Davis, Mr. Di Cenzo, Ms. Jager and Mr. Kelley.

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East Asian Studies: Courses in Various Disciplines

The following courses may be taken to fulfill the East Asian Studies major requirements. For questions concerning courses that are not listed below but which may count toward the major, consult a member of the East Asian Studies Program faculty. Courses marked with an asterisk (*) may be taken for capstone certification.
Art
104 Approaches to the History of East Asian Art
312* Seminar in Asian Art
Ethnomusicology
206 Music of East Asia
History
282 The Invention of Asia
284 Cultural History of Medieval Japan
285 Intellectual History of the Meiji Period (1886-1912)
344* State and Society in China
345 Social Movements in China from Late Imperial Times to the Present
350* Women in Modern Japan
351* National Schizophrenia and the Modern Japanese Novel
360* History of Vietnam
451* Research Seminar: Japanese in the Post-World War II International Arena: 1945-Present
452* Research Seminar: Japanese Domestic History Since the End of the Second World War: 1945-Present
Politics
110 Revolution, Socialism and Reform in China
212 The Political Economy of Development in Asia
311 Social Movements in China from Late Imperial Times to the Present
313* Seminar: Socialist Reform and Crisis in China
Religion
118 Colloquium: Immanence and Transcendence in Buddhism
319* Seminar: Taoism
322* Seminar: Selected Issues in Buddhism

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