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Cognitive Sciences Concentration

The Cognitive Sciences Concentration at Oberlin focuses on the study of human cognition from many perspectives ranging from the investigation of single neurons in the brain, to the analysis of the cognitive process of the individual, to the examination of complex decision making in social groups. The concentration is intended to familiarize students with the different methodological approaches used to investigate human cognition. Given the concentration's interdisciplinary nature, students will be required to take relevant courses from several fields of inquiry including psychology, neuroscience, computer science, economics, philosophy and anthropology.

Concentration Requirements. The following core courses in psychology and neuroscience are required for the concentration. Note that both courses have prerequisites.

Core Courses

PSYC 219 - Cognitive Psychology

or PSYC 220 - Cognitive Neuropsychology

NSCI 201 - The Brain: An Introduction to Neuroscience

or NSCI 204 - Human Neurobiology

In addition to the core course requirement, students must take four elective courses. To ensure breadth, each of the four elective courses must be from a different participating department within the cognitive sciences concentration (i.e., psychology, neuroscience, computer science, economics, philosophy and anthropology). Students should be aware that many of the elective courses have prerequisites. An appropriate, 3 credit private reading course may count as one of the electives, upon approval by the Cognitive Sciences Chair.

Elective Courses
250 Introduction to Anthropological Linguistics

251 Language, Culture and Society

Computer Science
299 Mind and Machine

364 Artificial Intelligence

Economics
232 Experimental Economics
313 Games and Strategy in Economics

Neuroscience
319 Neurophysiology: Neurons to Networks to Behavior
320 Neuroanatomy

325 Neuropharmacology

331 Hormones, Brain, and Behavior

Philosophy
200 Deductive Logic
201 The Analysis of Reasoning

220 Philosophy of Language

228 Philosophy of Mind

Psychology
206 Sensory Processes and Perception
303 Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology

305 Human Psychophysiology

420 Explorations in Cognitive Neuropsychology

Any student, regardless of major or minor, can pursue a Cognitive Sciences Concentration. The Cognitive Sciences Concentration does not substitute for a major or minor. Its completion will be noted on the student's final transcript along with majors, minors, and honors. Students wishing to pursue the concentration should consult with one of the faculty members of the Cognitive Sciences Concentration Committee: Michael Loose, chair (Neuroscience), Jim Tanaka (Psychology), Sam Carrier (Psychology), Luis Fernandez (Economics), Peter McInerney (Philosophy), and Stephen Wong (Computer Science). For up-to-date information on the concentration, see our web site at: http://www.oberlin.edu/~psych/cogsci.

Elective Courses


Anthropology
250 Introduction to Anthropological Linguistics (3 credits)

251 Language, Culture and Society (3 credits)

Computer Science
299 Mind and Machine (3 credits)
364 Artificial Intelligence (3 credits)

Economics
232 Experimental Economics (3 credits)
313 Games and Strategy in Economics (3 credits)

Neuroscience

100 Mind, Brain and Behavior (3 credits)
319 Neurophysiology (3 credits)

320 Neuroanatomy (3 credits)
325 Neuropharmacology (3 credits)
331 Endocrinology/Neuroendocrinology (3 credits)

Philosophy
200 Deductive Logic (3 credits)
201 The Analysis of Reasoning (3 credits)
220 Philosophy of Language (3 credits)
228 Philosophy of Mind (3 credits)

Psychology
206 Sensory Processes and Perception (3 credits)
303 Cognitive Lab (2 credits)
305 Human Psychophysiology (3 credits)
420 Explorations in Cognitive Neuropsychology (3 credits)

Any student, regardless of major or minor, can pursue a Cognitive Sciences Concentration. The Cognitive Sciences Concentration does not substitute for a major or minor. Its completion will be noted on the student's final transcript along with majors, minors, and honors. Students wishing to pursue the concentration should consult with one of the faculty members of the Cognitive Sciences Concentration Committee: Jim Tanaka, chair (Psychology), Sam Carrier (Psychology), Luis Fernandez (Economics), Peter McInerney (Philosophy), Michael Loose (Neuroscience), and Stephen Wong (Computer Science). For up-to-date information on the concentration, see our web site at: http://www.oberlin.edu/~psych/cogsci.

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