logo

figure

course catalog

e-mail

contact us

search

home



In this Department

Catalog 

 Other Links

Classics

Introduction. Due to the early and central position of Greek and Roman civilization in the development of the western tradition, acquaintance with classical thought and culture is an important part of a liberal arts education.

The Department offers courses in Classical Civilization covering aspects of literary creation, historical and social process, and the Greek and Roman contribution to areas such as philosophy, religion, and government. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. These courses provide a broad background for all areas of literary and humanistic study.

The Department offers courses in Greek and Latin language and literature for students who wish to develop a deeper understanding of the works and the capacity for making independent judgments about them. Acquisition of the languages is a prerequisite for advanced work. Elementary courses in the languages are designed to enable students to approach significant material as soon as possible.

Advanced Placement. Students who have been enrolled in this program in high school will be assigned advanced placement in accordance with the results of the qualifying examinations. A grade of 4 or 5 in the examination is required for the award of college credit.

Entry-Level Course Sequence Suggestions. Students just beginning to approach the classics should begin with Classics 100 (Myth and Hero in the Greek Epic), or with Latin 101 or Greek 101. Students are encouraged to enroll in any language course for which they are qualified. All entering students who have studied Latin or Greek previously should consult with a member of the Department before enrolling in any course in Latin or Greek.

Students with four years of secondary-school Latin (including Vergil) will ordinarily be eligible for Latin 202 (Catullus and Horace) offered in the second semester. Such students especially should consider beginning the study of Greek in the fall semester. Students with two or three years of secondary-school Latin will ordinarily be eligible for Latin 201 (Vergil).

Students whose preparation in Latin is deficient will be advised to enroll in or audit Latin 101, or to devote a Winter Term to review in order that they may enroll in Latin 102.

It should be noted that well-motivated students have done the equivalent of Greek 101 or of Latin 101 during a Winter Term and have then participated successfully in Greek 102 or Latin 102 in the spring.

Students considering a major in Greek or Latin should include in their freshman and sophomore programs four semesters of work in the language, Classics 100, and either Classics 103 (History of Greece) or 104 (History of Rome). Students who plan to major in Classical Civilization should take Classics 100, Classics 103 and two semesters of either Greek or Latin. Early consultation with the Classics Department concerning proposed plans of study is advisable, particularly for those who contemplate spending part of the junior or senior year in Rome or in Athens.
Major. A major in classics can serve as the central focus of a widely ranging undergraduate curriculum since it includes many areas of human activity and creativity, and it has so served for students who have gone on to careers in medicine, law, writing, etc.

Classics as a major or as a component part of an interdisciplinary or double major is preprofessional training for those who intend to engage in research and teaching at the university or college level in such fields as classics, classical archeology, comparative literature, religion, linguistics, medieval studies, philosophy, and many others. An undergraduate major in classics in whole or in part is also preparation for those who intend to teach languages, literatures, or humanities in junior colleges or secondary schools. Interested students are advised to consult with the chairperson in devising a major or partial major program which will meet with their needs and desires. Great flexibility is possible.

The Department of Classics offers three majors: Classical Civilization, Latin Language and Literature, and Greek Language and Literature.

1. The major in Classical Civilization includes Classical Civilization 100, 103, 104, 206, six more hours in Classical Civilization, at least two courses in Greek or Latin, and nine hours in "Related Courses" (see below).

Students with a preprofessional interest should select one of the majors below. Work in the other language and literature is strongly recommended. Attention is called to the possibility of a minor in the other language and literature (see below).

2. The major in Latin Language and Literature includes 12 hours in Latin above Latin 102, plus Classical Civilization 100, 104, 206, and six hours in "Related Courses."

3. The major in Greek Language and Literature includes 12 hours in Greek above Greek 102, plus Classical Civilization 100, 103, 206, and six hours in "Related Courses."

With the permission of the major advisor, additional work in Greek or Latin or appropriate courses from other departments in the College may be substituted for some of the above.

Minor. Students may receive a minor in Greek or Latin upon completion of approved programs of study. Such programs will consist of at least fifteen hours of courses in Classical Civilization, Greek Language and Literature, Latin Language and Literature, ancient philosophy, and classical art and archeology, and will ordinarily include Greek 202 or the equivalent for the minor in Greek and Latin 202 or the equivalent for the minor in Latin. Interested students are advised to consult the chairperson.

Honors. To be eligible for admission to the Honors Program, a student must have completed by the end of the junior year:

1. Two 300-level courses in either Greek or Latin and at least the 102-level course in the other classical language; or one 300-level course in Greek and one 300-level course in Latin; and

2. Classical Civilization 103 (Greek History) or 104 (Roman History); and

3. Two of the following: Classical Civilization 100, 206, 210, 215, 218.

The Department may invite qualified students to apply at the end of their junior year, but would also welcome applications from interested majors. Admission is based on overall academic distinction and outstanding work within the Department.

To be awarded honors, a student must:

1. complete a major in Latin or Greek;

2. complete satisfactorily in the first semester of the senior year, a reading list devised in consultation with a member of the Department and approved by the Department which includes primary (ancient) and secondary (critical, historical) readings;

3. complete satisfactorily a research project designed in consultation with members of the Department;

4. pass an oral examination on the reading list and research project. (This examination may be conducted by an outside examiner, who would also pass judgment on the honors project.)

Students participating in the Honors Program should register for Greek or Latin 501 and 502 for three units of credit each semester.

Related Courses. Attention is called to relevant courses in other departments:

Art

222 Greek and Roman Sculpture

224 The Technology of Greek and Roman Architecture
225 Women in Greece and Rome

321 Seminar in Ancient Art

History

101 Medieval European History

304 Classical Tradition in the Middle Ages and Renaissance

Philosophy

125 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy

302 Philosophical Classics: Aristotle

306 Philosophical Classics: Plato

Politics

231 European Political Thought: Classical to Early Modern Religion

Religion

206 Ancient Judaism from the Exile to the Rise of the Rabbis

208 The New Testament and Christian Origins

209 Women in Ancient Mediterranean Religions

337 Seminar: Graeco-Roman Religion

338 Selected Topics in Early Judaism and Christianity

Archeology. Students interested in classical archeology as a profession should note the availability of a concentration in Classical Archeology in Archeological Studies including both the relevant courses in classical art and archeology and basic training in the classical languages and literatures. For further information, see the separate listing under Archeological Studies above, or consult Ms. Kane in the Art Department.

Study Abroad. Oberlin College is a participating member of the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. A semester of study in Rome during the junior or senior year is available for qualified students majoring in the Department. There is also a program in Athens. Consult the chairperson for details.

Transfer of Credit. No more than half the hours credited toward the major may be granted for work at other recognized institutions.

Winter Term. The following faculty are particularly interested in sponsoring Winter Term projects as indicated. Mr. Helm: intensive beginning Greek; New Testament Greek. Ms. Lynn: intensive beginning Latin. Many other topics are also possible.

The Martin Classical Lectures are delivered annually at Oberlin College by an eminent visiting scholar. Thirty-four volumes in this distinguished series have appeared. The lecturer for 2001-2002 will be Professor Ian Morris.




back to top

 

Related Coures

Attention is called to relevant courses in other departments:
Art
222 Greek and Roman Sculpture
224 The Technology of Greek and Roman Architecture
225 Women in Greece and Rome
321 Seminar in Ancient Art
History
101 Medieval European History
304 Classical Tradition in the Middle Ages and Renaissance
Philosophy
125 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy
302 Philosophical Classics: Aristotle
306 Philosophical Classics: Plato
Politics
231 European Political Thought: Classical to Early Modern Religion
Religion
206 Ancient Judaism from the Exile to the Rise of the Rabbis
208 The New Testament and Christian Origins
209 Women in Ancient Mediterranean Religions
337 Seminar: Graeco-Roman Religion
338 Selected Topics in Early Judaism and Christianity
Archeology. Students interested in classical archeology as a profession should note the availability of a concentration in Classical Archeology in Archeological Studies including both the relevant courses in classical art and archeology and basic training in the classical languages and literatures. For further information, see the separate listing under Archeological Studies above, or consult Ms. Kane in the Art Department.
Study Abroad. Oberlin College is a participating member of the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. A semester of study in Rome during the junior or senior year is available for qualified students majoring in the Department. There is also a program in Athens. Consult the chairperson for details.
Transfer of Credit. No more than half the hours credited toward the major may be granted for work at other recognized institutions.
Winter Term. The following faculty are particularly interested in sponsoring Winter Term projects as indicated. Mr. Helm: intensive beginning Greek; New Testament Greek. Mr. Van Nortwick: intensive beginning Latin. Many other topics are also possible.
The Martin Classical Lectures are delivered annually at Oberlin College by an eminent visiting scholar. Thirty-four volumes in this distinguished series have appeared. The lecturer for 1999-2000 was Professor Julia Gaisser.

 




back to top

 

Classical Civilization

Classical Civilization

100. Myth and Hero in the Greek Epic 3 hours
3HU, WR
The critical study of the Iliad and the Odyssey, the first major literary works of ancient Greece, which were of enormous influence on Greek and Roman literary and cultural ideals and are thus crucial for the understanding of Western civilization in general. The heroic figures of Achilles, Hector, and Odysseus represent early and powerful versions of the tragic and comic heroes. One lecture and two discussion sections per week. Enrollment Limit: 60.
Sem 1 CLAS-100-01 MWF 11:00-11:50 Ms. Lynn, Staff

103. History of Greece 3 hours
3SS
Next offered 2002-2003.

104. History of Rome 3 hours
3SS
A survey of the history of Rome, from its prehistoric origins to its "decline and fall" in the fifth century A.D. Attention will be given to the evolution of social and political structures in Rome from the Republic to the Principate, Roman imperialism and the transition from paganism to Christianity. Readings from the ancient sources will provide the basis for our discussions of these
issues. May count toward a history major. Offered in alternate years.
Sem 1 CLAS-104-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Mr. Hedrick

206. Greek and Roman Drama in Translation 3 hours
3HU, WR
Close reading (in translation) of plays by the Greek dramatists Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes, and the Romans Seneca, Plautus, and Terence; particular emphasis on the place of women in the plays. Some secondary readings, participation in class discussion, papers, and final exam required. Identical to WOST 206. Enrollment Limit: 55.
Sem 2 CLAS-206-01 MWF 3:30-4:20 Mr. Van Nortwick

210. Greek and Roman Mythology 3 hours
3HU, WR
The myths of Greece and Rome primarily from classical sources. Attention will also be given to ancient and modern theories on the function of myth in society, as well as to its religious, philosophical and literary uses. Enrollment Limit: 55.
Sem 2 CLAS-210-01 TuTh 11:00-12:15 Staff

215. Ancient Literature and the Meaning of Life 3 hours
3HU, WR
Next offered 2002-2003.

218. No Second Troy: Versions of Helen 3 hours
3HU, CD
A study of the various, often conflicting, portrayals of Helen of Troy in Greek and Roman epic, tragedy, and lyric, supplemented by consideration of depictions of Helen in ancient art. Close reading of the texts in translation and of some secondary sources will inform larger discussions not only of Helen's "culpability" but also of the transformation of mythical material and the conceptualization of women in ancient art and literature.
Sem 2 CLAS-218-01 MWF 11:00-11:50 Ms. Lynn

501. Senior Project 2-3 hours
2-3HU
Intensive work on a topic selected in consultation with a member of the department, culminating in a presentation of a paper or other project. Prerequisites: Senior major standing and invitation of the department. Consent of instructor required.

995. Private Reading 1-3 hours
1-3HU
Consent of instructor required.




back to top

 

Greek

101. Elementary Greek 4 hours
4HU, CD
The essentials of the classical Greek language, with emphasis on reading. Enrollment Limit: 25.
Sem 1 GREK-101-01 MTuThF 10:00-10:50 Mr. Helm

102. Plato's Apology 4 hours
4HU, CD
Continuation of Elementary Greek, followed by reading and discussion of selections from Plato's Apology. Prerequisites: GREK 101 or equivalent.
Sem 2 GREK-102-01 MTuThF 10:00-10:50 Mr. Helm

201. Homer's Iliad 3 hours
3HU, CD
Reading and translation of selections from Homer's Iliad, with discussion of relevant critical issues and historical background. Prerequisites: GREK 102 or equivalent.
Sem 1 GREK-201-01 TuTh 9:35-10:50 Ms. Lynn

202. Introduction to Greek Tragedy 3 hours
3HU, CD
Reading, translation, and discussion of Euripides' Medea, supplemented by readings from the critical literature and of other tragedies in translation. Prerequisites: GREK 201 or consent of instructor.
Sem 2 GREK-202-01 TuTh 1:30-2:45 Staff

302. Herodotus 3 hours
3HU, CD
Selections from Herodotus' history will be read in Greek, and the entire history will be read in English. Discussion of historiographical issues include: Herodotus' place in the ancient tradition of history-writing; and the differences between ancient and modern conceptions of history. Prerequisities: GREK 202 or the equivalent.
Sem 1 GREK-302-01 Hours to be arranged Mr. Hedrick

304. Lyric Poetry 3 hours
3HU, CD
Next offered 2002-2003.

305. Sophocles 3 hours
3HU, CD
Readings, discussion, and papers on the tragedy of Sophocles. Close analysis of one play and a survey of the criticism and scholarship dealing with Sophocles. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisities: GREK 202 or the equivalent.
Sem 2 GREK-305-01 Hours to be arranged Mr. Van Nortwick

306. Homer's Odyssey 3 hours
3HU, CD
Next offered 2002-2003.

501, 502. Senior Honors 3-5 hours
3-5HU
Intensive work on a topic selected in consultation with a member of the department, culminating in a presentation of a paper or other project. Prerequisites: Senior major standing and invitation of the department.
Consent of instructor required.

995. Private Reading 1-3 hours
1-3HU
Consent of instructor required.




back to top

 

Latin

101. Elementary Latin 3 hours
3HU, CD
The essentials of the Latin language, with emphasis on reading. This course is intended for students with no previous training in Latin. Enrollment Limit: 35.
Sem 1 LATN-101-01 MWF 10:00-10:50 Ms. Lynn

102. Introduction to Latin Prose 3 hours
3HU, CD
Continuation of LATN 101. Completion of the study of the essentials of Latin grammar and reading of a variety of Latin prose, such as the younger Pliny's account of the eruption of
Vesuvius, and selections from the letters of Abelhard and Heloise and the Carmina Burana. Prerequisites: LATN 101 or equivalent.
Sem 2 LATN-102-01 MWF 10:00-10:50 Ms. Lynn

201. Introduction to Latin Literature: Vergil's Aeneid 3 hours
3HU, CD
Selections from the Aeneid will be read in Latin; the entire poem will be read in English, along with the Eclogues and Georgics and selections from other ancient epics. Discussion of Vergil's cultural, political and literary context; particular attention to the themes of the Aeneid and their significance. Prerequisites: LATN 102 or equivalent.
Sem 1 LATN-201-01 MW 2:30-3:45 Mr. Hedrick

202. Lyric Poetry: Catullus and Horace 3 hours
3HU, CD
A careful study of selected poems of Horace and Catullus. Regular student reports and class discussion and analysis of lyric poetry. Occasional lectures on literary antecedents and the historical background of the late Republic and early empire. Prerequisites: LATN 201 or equivalent.
Sem 2 LATN-202-01 MWF 1:30-2:20 Staff

303. Lucretius and Epicurean Philosophy 3 hours
3HU, CD
A study of Epicurean philosophy and early Greek science based on major sections of Lucretius' De Rerum Natura. Papers and discussion on the basic critical issues. Offering in alternate years. Prerequisities: LATN 202 or equivalent.
Sem 1 LATN-303-01 Hours to be arranged Staff

304. Roman Comedy 3 hours
3HU, CD
Next offered 2002-2003.

306. Ovid 3 hours
3HU, CD
Next offered 2002-2003.

308. Tacitus 3 hours
3HU, CD
A book of Tacitus' Annals will be read in Latin; the Annals and his other works will be read entirely in English. Discussion of historiographical issues: Tacitus and his political context; his place in the Roman tradition of history-writing; his conception of the functions of history. Prerequisities: LATN 202 or equivalent.
Sem 2 LATN-308-01 Hours to be arranged Mr. Van Nortwick

501, 502. Senior Honors 3-5 hours
3-5HU
Intensive work on a topic selected in consultation with a member of the department, culminating in a presentation of a paper or other project. Prerequisites: Senior major standing and invitation of the department. Consent of instructor required.

995. Private Reading 1-3 hours
1-3HU
Consent of instructor required.

back to top

copyright

line

comments

email

search

ochome