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82. Andrew Hale Noah Hall (1932-    )

Andrew Hale Noah Hall

Andrew Hale Noah Hall, n.d.

167 Woodland Street

Noah Hall was named in honor of Mr. Andrew H. Noah of Akron, Ohio, for seven years a member of the Board of Trustees, who contributed $100,000 towards its construction. Mr. C.W. Frank of Akron was the architect. The building was erected by Crowell and Little of Cleveland. Ground was broken for its construction February 16, 1932, and the hall was first used in the fall of 1932. The total cost, including furnishings and equipment, was $166,000. The building is 172 feet long by 42 feet wide, three stories in height, with a basement of 10 ½ feet and a finished attic. It faces toward the east, opening on to a stone terrace. Noah Hall is divided vertically into three sections, each section with separate entrance and individual lounge. Two of the sections accommodate thirty men each, and the third one, twenty-five. Constructed in the Georgian style of architecture, Noah Hall is the first unit to be erected on the new Men’s Campus. The Men’s Campus project, as approved by the Faculty and the Board of Trustees in 1928 and 1929, sets aside for the purpose somewhat more than one-half of the block bounded by Professor, Lorain, Woodland, and Union Streets. The plans call for the erection of eleven houses of residence of various sizes, accommodating approximately five hundred men for rooms, together with a large club house containing provision for meals and for the social life of the men. The aim of the Men’s Campus plan, as adopted, is formulated as follows: “That Oberlin shall have a Men’s Campus on which the men will live together in buildings owned and operated by the College, a campus on which the life of men can be organized and developed in such a way as to stimulate scholarly ambition and to create an active masculine social atmosphere.” [Today, Noah houses ninety-seven upper class, co-ed students.]

 
 
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